A Photography forum. PhotoBanter.com

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » PhotoBanter.com forum » Digital Photography » Digital Photography
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

Beer with me



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #11  
Old November 9th 18, 06:07 AM posted to rec.photo.digital
Ron C
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 347
Default Beer with me

On 11/8/2018 11:18 PM, nospam wrote:
In article , Tony Cooper
wrote:

Anheuser-Busch did the seemingly impossible. They came up with the
world's worst beer - Budweiser - and made it even worse: Bud Light.


not that those are any good, but there are definitely worse.

Brings to mind things such as:
Olde Frothingslosh, the "pale, stale ale with the foam on the bottom.
Brewed with just a kiss of the mops.
--
==
Later...
Ron C
--

  #12  
Old November 9th 18, 08:00 AM posted to rec.photo.digital
RJH
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 176
Default Beer with me

On 09/11/2018 03:03, Tony Cooper wrote:
On Fri, 9 Nov 2018 12:28:23 +1000, alvey wrote:

On Thu, 08 Nov 2018 19:54:54 -0500, Tony Cooper wrote:

On Thu, 08 Nov 2018 19:51:01 -0500, Tony Cooper
wrote:

In the US, a person who orders a beer in a bar

You can ignore this thread.


Why? It's more interesting than a lot of the usual drivel.

Anyway, to posit an answer... There's far more choices of beer in the UK
than there are in the USA and it's not uncommon for drinkers to have
different beers in different pubs. Or even in the same pub. The UK pub
scene is grand. There's usually a vast choice within walking distance of
home and the tone is much more relaxed and happily sociable than any other
country I've drunk in.


Yes, although pubs have been taking a hit for some years now with many
closures - especially in London.

There's been a drive towards chain pubs - they do some marvellous things
with old buildings (especially banks now they're no longer needed in the
same way), but the quality and atmosphere is what you might expect with
cheap beer.

Where I live (Sheffield, S. Yorkshire) there's still a good selection -
maybe 6 decent pubs within 10 minutes walk for me.

I generally stick to the one I like - I prefer 'malty' but there's a
recent trend towards 'hoppy' - it's very rare that I can't find a beer I
like.


I've been to the UK several times, but always had a problem knowing
what beer to order. When I found one I liked, the temptation was to
order that same one again, but the other temptation to try something
else looking for one even better.


It's entirely acceptable to ask for a taste before you buy.

I've never been one to go to bars in the US. Too often they are dark
and noisy. Pubs, though are a joy to visit.


Generally I'd agree - not had that much experience of US bars though,
and my London experience (having lived there 20 years) is not especially
good.


--
Cheers, Rob
  #13  
Old November 9th 18, 10:09 AM posted to rec.photo.digital
Eric Stevens
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 12,467
Default Beer with me

On Thu, 08 Nov 2018 19:51:01 -0500, Tony Cooper
wrote:

In the US, a person who orders a beer in a bar usually orders the same
brand each time. He will settle on some brand - Bud, Michelob, Coors,
Samuel Adams, etc - and stick with it. He may try a craft beer once
in a while, or change brands if his brand isn't available, but most
beer drinkers are loyal to a brand.

I just finished a Peter Robinson "Inspector Banks" novel ("Sleeping in
the Ground") and noticed something a bit different. Banks frequently
meets with his cohorts in some pub in Yorkshire to discuss a case. All
pubs are in the same general area and often it's the same pub as
another quote. The following are his choices:

"...ordered a pint of Sneck Lifter..."

"...bought a pint of Timothy Taylor Landlord's Bitter..."

"...sipping his pint of Daleside bitter..."

"...went for pints of Black Sheep bitter..."

"...ordered a pint of Timothy Taylor's Landlord Bitter..."

"...ordered a couple of pints of lager..."

(Yes, the possessives are different in the two quotes from the book
for Timothy Taylor)

I don't normally get diverted by anomalies like this, but these jumped
out at me.

No conclusions drawn, but I thought it was interesting.


All of those are draught beers (served in pint glasses). It's probable
that each pub had a different range of beers available. Inspector
Banks would have to choose his beer from the range on tap.
--

Regards,

Eric Stevens
  #14  
Old November 9th 18, 02:26 PM posted to rec.photo.digital
newshound
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 271
Default Beer with me

On 09/11/2018 02:28, alvey wrote:
On Thu, 08 Nov 2018 19:54:54 -0500, Tony Cooper wrote:

On Thu, 08 Nov 2018 19:51:01 -0500, Tony Cooper
wrote:

In the US, a person who orders a beer in a bar


You can ignore this thread.


Why? It's more interesting than a lot of the usual drivel.

Anyway, to posit an answer... There's far more choices of beer in the UK
than there are in the USA and it's not uncommon for drinkers to have
different beers in different pubs. Or even in the same pub. The UK pub
scene is grand. There's usually a vast choice within walking distance of
home and the tone is much more relaxed and happily sociable than any other
country I've drunk in.



alvey



+1 on both points!
  #15  
Old November 9th 18, 02:51 PM posted to rec.photo.digital
newshound
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 271
Default Beer with me

On 09/11/2018 03:23, alvey wrote:
On Thu, 08 Nov 2018 22:03:13 -0500, Tony Cooper wrote:

On Fri, 9 Nov 2018 12:28:23 +1000, alvey wrote:

On Thu, 08 Nov 2018 19:54:54 -0500, Tony Cooper wrote:

On Thu, 08 Nov 2018 19:51:01 -0500, Tony Cooper
wrote:

In the US, a person who orders a beer in a bar

You can ignore this thread.

Why? It's more interesting than a lot of the usual drivel.

Anyway, to posit an answer... There's far more choices of beer in the UK
than there are in the USA and it's not uncommon for drinkers to have
different beers in different pubs. Or even in the same pub. The UK pub
scene is grand. There's usually a vast choice within walking distance of
home and the tone is much more relaxed and happily sociable than any other
country I've drunk in.


I've been to the UK several times, but always had a problem knowing
what beer to order. When I found one I liked, the temptation was to
order that same one again, but the other temptation to try something
else looking for one even better.


It's difficult to find a bad one. On one trip I was (mostly) there for 3
months and set a goal of trying 100 different beers. Made it to 97 and only
had two that were ****e; Wandsworth 6X and something that I can't recall
but do remember returning it orally to where I suspect it originated, the
Shipping Canal in Manchester.


A complication for the UK beer drinker is that the *proper* draught
stuff is unpasturised and un-filtered, so that there is much more chance
of infections causing "off" flavours if either the brewery or the pub
landlord are not sufficiently careful. This also means that unless a pub
has sufficient turnover, you may well get a pint that is past its best
even if it hasn't reached the stage of having a detectable vinegar aroma.

When I started drinking 50-odd years ago, if three or four lads went
into a pub, even their "local", they would each start with a half of
something different, to decide which was the best on the day.

Visiting a strange pub, the experienced drinker will try to figure out
what the locals are drinking before ordering. It's not wise to ask the
landlord what he recommends, because that will often be a barrel that is
moving slowly.

In the old days, a bad pint of Wadworth's 6X was virtually unknown,
because it was produced by a relatively small Somerset brewery and not
shipped very far. Now it is produced by one of the big brewers, and
afficionados do not consider it to be the same thing. I still fondly
remember my first pint of 6X, not least because the landlord actually
apologised because it was "from the wood", this being in the days when
"keg" beer (i.e. pasturised and filtered and shipped in metal barrels)
was considered modern.

I think there is less "bad beer" around now than there was "back then"
because standards have risen. But I'd still consider about one pint in
ten to be unsatisfactory.

Less beer is being drunk too. In the old days many breweries would
deliver to their local pubs in 36 gallon barrels, and these would be
drunk in a couple of days. Now, you only sometimes find "18s" and a lot
of beer is delivered in "9s". (These used to be known as a barrel, a
kilderkin, and a firkin respectively).

The English gallon is of course larger than the American one, at 4.6 litres.

  #16  
Old November 9th 18, 04:40 PM posted to rec.photo.digital
-hh
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 710
Default Beer with me

On Friday, November 9, 2018 at 12:08:04 AM UTC-5, Ron C wrote:
On 11/8/2018 11:18 PM, nospam wrote:
In article , Tony Cooper
wrote:

Anheuser-Busch did the seemingly impossible. They came up with the
world's worst beer - Budweiser - and made it even worse: Bud Light.


not that those are any good, but there are definitely worse.

Brings to mind things such as:
Olde Frothingslosh, the "pale, stale ale with the foam on the bottom.
Brewed with just a kiss of the mops.


Decades ago, the Philadelphia Tee Shirt Museum had a shirt with
the logo of a fictional (I hope) beer. The graphic was of a
pretty mountain stream with a bear in it ...with a raised leg.
It read:

"Bear Wiz Beer ... the color is in the water".


-hh
  #17  
Old November 9th 18, 06:05 PM posted to rec.photo.digital
-hh
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 710
Default Beer with me

On Friday, November 9, 2018 at 8:51:30 AM UTC-5, newshound wrote:
On 09/11/2018 03:23, alvey wrote:
On Thu, 08 Nov 2018 22:03:13 -0500, Tony Cooper wrote:
[...]

I've been to the UK several times, but always had a problem knowing
what beer to order. When I found one I liked, the temptation...


It's difficult to find a bad one.


In general, what is 'bad' is usually something of a particular style
that one doesn't care for...although this can include stuff that's
just plain "too plain" (including many American 'Lite' beers).

On one trip I was (mostly) there for 3 months and set a goal
of trying 100 different beers. Made it to 97 ...


Had a business trip where my wife joined me for a long weekend before
my meetings; IIRC she got to experience around 25 beers in ~4 days.
That's 3 beers/day that she ordered, plus a sip of 3/day of mine.

and only had two that were ****e; Wandsworth 6X and something
that I can't recall but do remember returning it orally to where
I suspect it originated, the Shipping Canal in Manchester.


A complication for the UK beer drinker is that the *proper* draught
stuff is unpasturised and un-filtered, so that there is much more chance
of infections causing "off" flavours if either the brewery or the pub
landlord are not sufficiently careful. This also means that unless a pub
has sufficient turnover, you may well get a pint that is past its best
even if it hasn't reached the stage of having a detectable vinegar aroma.


A good point, as there's also this reality of beer getting old/stale
and/or "skunky", which makes it not representative of what it tastes
like when fresh.

When I started drinking 50-odd years ago, if three or four lads went
into a pub, even their "local", they would each start with a half of
something different, to decide which was the best on the day.

Visiting a strange pub, the experienced drinker will try to figure out
what the locals are drinking before ordering. It's not wise to ask the
landlord what he recommends, because that will often be a barrel that is
moving slowly.

In the old days, a bad pint of Wadworth's 6X was virtually unknown,
because it was produced by a relatively small Somerset brewery and not
shipped very far.


I was fortunate enough to have encountered it this way, back in the
1990s (and really enjoyed it) when it was reportedly still delivered
only by mule drawn wagon...I believe that I was in the city of Bath.

Now it is produced by one of the big brewers, and
afficionados do not consider it to be the same thing. I still fondly
remember my first pint of 6X, not least because the landlord actually
apologised because it was "from the wood", this being in the days when
"keg" beer (i.e. pasturised and filtered and shipped in metal barrels)
was considered modern.

I think there is less "bad beer" around now than there was "back then"
because standards have risen. But I'd still consider about one pint in
ten to be unsatisfactory.

Less beer is being drunk too. In the old days many breweries would
deliver to their local pubs in 36 gallon barrels, and these would be
drunk in a couple of days. Now, you only sometimes find "18s" and a lot
of beer is delivered in "9s". (These used to be known as a barrel, a
kilderkin, and a firkin respectively).

The English gallon is of course larger than the American one, at 4.6 litres.


In the USA, a similar example of this can often be found with the
kegs of Guinness Stout, where probably 99% of it is consumed around
St Patrick's Day in March. Unless a place has a regular Guinness
clientele, a keg that's still not been finished in May is going to be
quite noticeably a different note.


-hh
  #18  
Old November 9th 18, 08:32 PM posted to rec.photo.digital
alvey[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3
Default Beer with me

On Fri, 9 Nov 2018 13:51:25 +0000, newshound wrote:

On 09/11/2018 03:23, alvey wrote:
On Thu, 08 Nov 2018 22:03:13 -0500, Tony Cooper wrote:

On Fri, 9 Nov 2018 12:28:23 +1000, alvey wrote:

On Thu, 08 Nov 2018 19:54:54 -0500, Tony Cooper wrote:

On Thu, 08 Nov 2018 19:51:01 -0500, Tony Cooper
wrote:

In the US, a person who orders a beer in a bar

You can ignore this thread.

Why? It's more interesting than a lot of the usual drivel.

Anyway, to posit an answer... There's far more choices of beer in the UK
than there are in the USA and it's not uncommon for drinkers to have
different beers in different pubs. Or even in the same pub. The UK pub
scene is grand. There's usually a vast choice within walking distance of
home and the tone is much more relaxed and happily sociable than any other
country I've drunk in.


I've been to the UK several times, but always had a problem knowing
what beer to order. When I found one I liked, the temptation was to
order that same one again, but the other temptation to try something
else looking for one even better.


It's difficult to find a bad one. On one trip I was (mostly) there for 3
months and set a goal of trying 100 different beers. Made it to 97 and only
had two that were ****e; Wandsworth 6X and something that I can't recall
but do remember returning it orally to where I suspect it originated, the
Shipping Canal in Manchester.


A complication for the UK beer drinker is that the *proper* draught
stuff is unpasturised and un-filtered, so that there is much more chance
of infections causing "off" flavours if either the brewery or the pub
landlord are not sufficiently careful. This also means that unless a pub
has sufficient turnover, you may well get a pint that is past its best
even if it hasn't reached the stage of having a detectable vinegar aroma.

When I started drinking 50-odd years ago, if three or four lads went
into a pub, even their "local", they would each start with a half of
something different, to decide which was the best on the day.

Visiting a strange pub, the experienced drinker will try to figure out
what the locals are drinking before ordering. It's not wise to ask the
landlord what he recommends, because that will often be a barrel that is
moving slowly.

In the old days, a bad pint of Wadworth's 6X was virtually unknown,
because it was produced by a relatively small Somerset brewery and not
shipped very far. Now it is produced by one of the big brewers, and
afficionados do not consider it to be the same thing. I still fondly
remember my first pint of 6X, not least because the landlord actually
apologised because it was "from the wood", this being in the days when
"keg" beer (i.e. pasturised and filtered and shipped in metal barrels)
was considered modern.

I think there is less "bad beer" around now than there was "back then"
because standards have risen. But I'd still consider about one pint in
ten to be unsatisfactory.

Less beer is being drunk too. In the old days many breweries would
deliver to their local pubs in 36 gallon barrels, and these would be
drunk in a couple of days. Now, you only sometimes find "18s" and a lot
of beer is delivered in "9s". (These used to be known as a barrel, a
kilderkin, and a firkin respectively).

The English gallon is of course larger than the American one, at 4.6 litres.


Thanks newshound. Most informative and interesting.



alvey



alvey
  #19  
Old November 11th 18, 12:43 AM posted to rec.photo.digital
Alan Browne[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 104
Default Beer with me

On 2018-11-08 19:51, Tony Cooper wrote:
In the US, a person who orders a beer in a bar usually orders the same
brand each time. He will settle on some brand - Bud, Michelob, Coors,
Samuel Adams, etc - and stick with it. He may try a craft beer once
in a while, or change brands if his brand isn't available, but most
beer drinkers are loyal to a brand.

I just finished a Peter Robinson "Inspector Banks" novel ("Sleeping in
the Ground") and noticed something a bit different. Banks frequently
meets with his cohorts in some pub in Yorkshire to discuss a case. All
pubs are in the same general area and often it's the same pub as
another quote. The following are his choices:

"...ordered a pint of Sneck Lifter..."

"...bought a pint of Timothy Taylor Landlord's Bitter..."

"...sipping his pint of Daleside bitter..."

"...went for pints of Black Sheep bitter..."

"...ordered a pint of Timothy Taylor's Landlord Bitter..."

"...ordered a couple of pints of lager..."

(Yes, the possessives are different in the two quotes from the book
for Timothy Taylor)

I don't normally get diverted by anomalies like this, but these jumped
out at me.

No conclusions drawn, but I thought it was interesting.


Other than Sam Adams, what you mentioned in your first para. isn't even
beer.

I vary more on the road, but at home tend to stick to local smaller
scale breweries and some micros.

--
"2/3 of Donald Trump's wives were immigrants. Proof that we
need immigrants to do jobs that most Americans wouldn't do."
- unknown protester
  #20  
Old November 11th 18, 01:48 AM posted to rec.photo.digital
Tony Cooper[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 80
Default Beer with me

On Sat, 10 Nov 2018 18:43:07 -0500, Alan Browne
wrote:

On 2018-11-08 19:51, Tony Cooper wrote:
In the US, a person who orders a beer in a bar usually orders the same
brand each time. He will settle on some brand - Bud, Michelob, Coors,
Samuel Adams, etc - and stick with it. He may try a craft beer once
in a while, or change brands if his brand isn't available, but most
beer drinkers are loyal to a brand.

I just finished a Peter Robinson "Inspector Banks" novel ("Sleeping in
the Ground") and noticed something a bit different. Banks frequently
meets with his cohorts in some pub in Yorkshire to discuss a case. All
pubs are in the same general area and often it's the same pub as
another quote. The following are his choices:

"...ordered a pint of Sneck Lifter..."

"...bought a pint of Timothy Taylor Landlord's Bitter..."

"...sipping his pint of Daleside bitter..."

"...went for pints of Black Sheep bitter..."

"...ordered a pint of Timothy Taylor's Landlord Bitter..."

"...ordered a couple of pints of lager..."

(Yes, the possessives are different in the two quotes from the book
for Timothy Taylor)

I don't normally get diverted by anomalies like this, but these jumped
out at me.

No conclusions drawn, but I thought it was interesting.


Other than Sam Adams, what you mentioned in your first para. isn't even
beer.

Personal taste has nothing to do with what I wrote. The statement
represents what most Americans do. While I never order any of those
brands, they are among the best-selling brands in the US.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Free BEER! [email protected] Digital SLR Cameras 2 May 27th 07 05:56 PM
Free BEER! [email protected] 35mm Photo Equipment 2 May 24th 07 08:16 AM
Beer makes me sick Arty Phacting Digital Photography 6 August 7th 04 12:05 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 02:41 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2018 PhotoBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.