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A simple way to transfer photos from your phone to Windows without installing anything on either



 
 
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  #51  
Old February 27th 18, 11:28 PM posted to rec.photo.digital,alt.windows7.general
nospam
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Posts: 21,698
Default A simple way to transfer photos from your phone to Windows without installing anything on either

In article , Ken Blake
wrote:


I've bought a new terabyte disk, and now have two terabyte disks side by
side (which I might RAID once I clean them out - but I never did RAID
before and googling finds that there are a LOT of up-front decisions to
make).


If you mean RAID 0 (striping), although it sounds like it should speed
up disk access, my experience is that it doesn't.


then you did something wrong, perhaps using a ****ty raid controller or
it was bottlenecked with a slow link, such as usb 2.

raid 0 definitely speeds things up, but doubles the risk of failure.

If you mean RAID 1 (mirroring), be aware that it is *not* a backup
solution. RAID 1 uses two or more drives, each a duplicate of the
others, to provide redundancy, not backup. It's used in situations
(almost always within corporations, not in homes) where any downtown
can't be tolerated, because the way it works is that if one drive
fails the other takes over seamlessly.


correct, although it's sometimes used in homes too.

the other issue is that the reliability of modern drives virtually
guarantees a failure on rebuild, particularly with raid 5.
  #52  
Old February 28th 18, 12:27 AM posted to rec.photo.digital,alt.windows7.general
ultred ragnusen
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Posts: 92
Default A simple way to transfer photos from your phone to Windows without installing anything on either

Ken Blake wrote:

"Why RAID is (usually) a Terrible Idea"
http://www.pugetsystems.com/articles?&id=29


Yikes. I only googled and saw that there were a bunch of decisions to be
made.

May I presume to ask if "any" RAID method is useful in the home
environment, where all you really care about is safety of your data?

In my case, I don't even need one Terabyte disk, but now I have two.

My other option is to make one disk a Linux disk and the other a Windows
disk, where I can skip the whole GRUB mess since the HP Pavilion will boot
off of any disk you tell it to at startup.
  #53  
Old February 28th 18, 12:42 AM posted to rec.photo.digital,alt.windows7.general
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Posts: 21,698
Default A simple way to transfer photos from your phone to Windows without installing anything on either

In article , ultred ragnusen
wrote:


"Why RAID is (usually) a Terrible Idea"
http://www.pugetsystems.com/articles?&id=29


Yikes. I only googled and saw that there were a bunch of decisions to be
made.


that's an *extremely* outdated article that doesn't really say much,
and there aren't very many decisions to make, other than the variant of
raid to use, which depends on what you want out of it.

May I presume to ask if "any" RAID method is useful in the home
environment, where all you really care about is safety of your data?


very much so, except that it's *not* a backup.
  #54  
Old February 28th 18, 02:16 AM posted to rec.photo.digital,alt.windows7.general
Paul[_10_]
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Posts: 50
Default A simple way to transfer photos from your phone to Windows withoutinstalling anything on either

nospam wrote:
In article , Ken Blake
wrote:

I've bought a new terabyte disk, and now have two terabyte disks side by
side (which I might RAID once I clean them out - but I never did RAID
before and googling finds that there are a LOT of up-front decisions to
make).

If you mean RAID 0 (striping), although it sounds like it should speed
up disk access, my experience is that it doesn't.


then you did something wrong, perhaps using a ****ty raid controller or
it was bottlenecked with a slow link, such as usb 2.

raid 0 definitely speeds things up, but doubles the risk of failure.


With an Areca card and multiple HDD disks in Raid0, you can hit
2GB/sec sustained. The limitation on cards like that, was the onboard
processor. The clock rate on the processor was rising with time.
(At one time, the RAID0 was only 800MB/sec or so.)

The cards handle RAID5 (which needs XOR) as well as RAID0
(which doesn't need XOR), and the processor on the card probably
isn't adding a lot of value when running RAID0. But Areca
is pretty happy to have you buy the card anyway, and
the card supports RAID0 for the "racing crowd". The largest
card might have had 24 SATA connectors on it.

Even a single NVMe Flash storage product today can hit I/O
rates like that, and with a much cheaper infrastructure cost.
The Areca cards, the really big ones, were $1000 each.
Whereas regular people can afford to buy NVMe products
(suitable for scratch disks say). The NVMe wouldn't be a
particularly good format for archival storage (your
finished product), but might be good to make your movie
editor go fast.

I still haven't figured out what technical endeavor NVMe
was invented for, and the speed isn't always well matched
by the rest of the computer. (Lots of stuff
you do, won't be saturating your NVMe. For example, the
CRC32 hash program I use as a speed benchmark, only hits
1.3-1.5GB/sec, when an NVMe can do 2.5GB/sec. And I can't
think of too many other programs that work that fast.
Many other programs are happy to putter along at 300MB/sec.
If you're not a very good programmer, you should be able
to hit 300MB/sec. Hitting the higher rates takes work.)

Paul
  #55  
Old February 28th 18, 02:32 AM posted to rec.photo.digital,alt.windows7.general
Paul[_10_]
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Posts: 50
Default A simple way to transfer photos from your phone to Windows withoutinstalling anything on either

ultred ragnusen wrote:
Ken Blake wrote:

"Why RAID is (usually) a Terrible Idea"
http://www.pugetsystems.com/articles?&id=29


Yikes. I only googled and saw that there were a bunch of decisions to be
made.

May I presume to ask if "any" RAID method is useful in the home
environment, where all you really care about is safety of your data?

In my case, I don't even need one Terabyte disk, but now I have two.

My other option is to make one disk a Linux disk and the other a Windows
disk, where I can skip the whole GRUB mess since the HP Pavilion will boot
off of any disk you tell it to at startup.


This is like asking whether it's a good idea to
keep alligators in an aquarium tank.

No, it's not a good idea.

Yes, with planning, and practice in terms of what
to do if things go wrong, you could do it. People
keep snakes at home. At least, until in one case,
a rather large snake got loose and suffocated two
kids by strangulation in an adjacent apartment.

If you're going to use RAID, you practice on an
empty array, you practice "fire drills". What to
do if it says "degraded". What to do if it says
"failed", because the SATA connectors fell off.
(In some cases, you can recover from that.) Most
people who use RAID without reading the manual,
they usually get a "scary shock" some day, and the
people out there who panic easily, they're not
candidates for RAID.

You should back up your RAID, to an external disk.
Just like you would with a single drive. Now,
how much benefit does RAID provide, if you still
have to make backups ? Some people have the funny
idea that a RAID1 mirror is a backup. When it isn't.

As long as you understand *why* you've selected
a particular RAID config, you're going to be fine.
If you want to construct a huge RAID0 scratch
array, for some weird "raw" video format, that's
perfectly fine. Since you know it's a scratch disk,
if it dies, you only lose todays edits. Your
archival movie content is on another, larger backup drive.

There are also people, who run 16TB arrays full of
ripped movie content, and with *no backups*. They
can't afford backup drives. They could only
afford the drives for the array. And that's their
decision. They realize if the array fails, they're
going to have to rip from source DVDs all over again,
which could involve a lot of hours of work. As long
as they know this will (eventually) happen, why not
let them use RAID ? All it would take, is one power
supply failure (overvolting) to burn the entire array.
You can explain it to them, and they absorb the info
and accept the risk.

Paul
  #56  
Old February 28th 18, 03:08 AM posted to rec.photo.digital,alt.windows7.general
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Posts: 21,698
Default A simple way to transfer photos from your phone to Windows without installing anything on either

In article , Paul
wrote:

With an Areca card and multiple HDD disks in Raid0, you can hit
2GB/sec sustained.


that's not particularly good, particularly since single ssds are faster.

The cards handle RAID5 (which needs XOR) as well as RAID0


raid 5 is dangerous with high capacity drives. do not use.

I still haven't figured out what technical endeavor NVMe
was invented for,


because it isn't bottlenecked by sata.

and the speed isn't always well matched
by the rest of the computer.


then the rest of the computer isn't very good.
  #57  
Old February 28th 18, 03:41 PM posted to rec.photo.digital,alt.windows7.general
PeterN[_7_]
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Posts: 1,013
Default A simple way to transfer photos from your phone to Windowswithout installing anything on either

On 2/26/2018 10:46 PM, ultred ragnusen wrote:
Mike S wrote:

Apologies, I didn't read that you'd gone through all of that. Good luck.


No problem. I appreciate the help, and the tribal record will show others
how to recover from a bricked MS Windows 10 Pro update.

Basically, you must first try all the viable options in the Windows
recovery console using the original HDD.
http://wetakepic.com/images/2018/02/...tore_gui_1.jpg

Then you do all that again, using the absolute latest DVD ISO you can find,
and, if you can find the same DVD ISO as the OS that was bricked, you do it
a third time.
http://wetakepic.com/images/2018/02/...dvd_repair.jpg

That's all that the Microsoft Technical Support people will do, so then you
bring it down to the local Microsoft Retail Store for them to try to fix.
http://wetakepic.com/images/2018/02/...il_store_6.jpg

You leave it with them for a few days, where they will try to recover the
OS but if they can't they'll be glad to recover your data (which I didn't
have them do because I backed it up with Knoppix ahead of time).
http://wetakepic.com/images/2018/02/...il_store_7.jpg

They will back up your data to their servers or to any drive you give them,
if you want them to, but I can't imagine that they could /find/ your data,
so I'm sure if you trust them, you'll lose a lot.
http://wetakepic.com/images/2018/02/...il_store_1.jpg

Anyway, they will fail but when I asked them what they did, they told me
they first ran diagnostics, then they tried the recovery console of the
boot drive, then the recovery console of the latest Windows Creator
edition, and then the recovery console of an older version of Windows 10
and then they ran bcdedit to try to fix the boot record.

It all failed but they said there's nothing wrong with the HDD or RAM or
motherboard so I picked up my desktop today and am using it now after
stopping off at Fryes to buy an SATA III cable and a molex-to-SATA adapter
for the power.
http://wetakepic.com/images/2018/02/...a_cables_1.jpg

I had to simply move the SATA position 1 on the motherboard to the boot
drive, leaving SATA 2 on the motherboard connected to the DVD disc drive,
and then put the new SATAIII cable on SATA position 3 on the motherboard to
mount the old HDD, and everything booted up fine.
http://wetakepic.com/images/2018/02/...e_system_2.jpg

I can "see" the old HDD, plus some debugging files the Microsoft store
geniuses left behind.
http://wetakepic.com/images/2018/02/...ystem8f091.jpg

Where the issue is really closed except for me to try to write up the saga
so that the Windows tribal knowledge is updated with the lessons learned.

Basically, some of the lessons learned is:
1. Windows 10 Update bricks a lot of systems (at least one a day is handled
by the Microsoft retail store)
2. The solution first is to try every viable option in the recovery
console, and then try it with a new Windows 10 ISO and then with an old
Windows 10 ISO.
3. If that fails, then try to recover the boot records with bcdedit.

When/if that fails, you simply start over after backing up your data, where
you "should" be able to mount the HDD (I was able to) to save your data
with testdisk or knoppix or ddrescue or PhotoRec or Recuva, etc.
http://wetakepic.com/images/2018/02/...t_device_1.jpg

In my case, it mounted just fine - although Knoppix gave some weird errors
but I'm not too worried because after buying SATA and power cables, I now
have two terabyte HDDs in my laptop.
http://wetakepic.com/images/2018/02/...t_device_2.jpg


Your information is good. Years ago I learned the hard way to keep all
my data on a portable HDD, and back up regularly.

To change the topic slightly: It seems to me that the quality of service
at the Windows store is a few notches below what it was abut a year ago.
Is it only my local stores, or have others noticed th4e same thing. I am
talking about the the stores in Roosevelt Field, and Walt Whitman. Last
week I had an issue, with the machine running slow. The store wanted me
to leave the machine so they could run tests. I took it to a local guy,
the issue was a virus, that my AV didn't pick up. It now works fine.











--
PeterN
  #58  
Old February 28th 18, 03:45 PM posted to rec.photo.digital,alt.windows7.general
Ken Blake[_2_]
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Posts: 11
Default A simple way to transfer photos from your phone to Windows without installing anything on either

On Tue, 27 Feb 2018 16:27:28 -0800, ultred ragnusen
wrote:

Ken Blake wrote:

"Why RAID is (usually) a Terrible Idea"
http://www.pugetsystems.com/articles?&id=29


Yikes. I only googled and saw that there were a bunch of decisions to be
made.

May I presume to ask if "any" RAID method is useful in the home
environment, where all you really care about is safety of your data?



Not as far as I'm concerned. You get safety through backup.\
  #59  
Old February 28th 18, 05:32 PM posted to rec.photo.digital,alt.windows7.general
ultred ragnusen
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Posts: 92
Default A simple way to transfer photos from your phone to Windows without installing anything on either

Paul wrote:

how much benefit does RAID provide, if you still
have to make backups ? Some people have the funny
idea that a RAID1 mirror is a backup. When it isn't.


Oh... sheepish look on my face ... yeah ... who would have a funny idea
that RAID is for backups ... not me (anymore anyway).

OK. So I won't bother with RAID. I will just make the new disk a Linux
disk, and dispense with grub to use this plan of action (after I back up
the data on the old disk).

1. I'll keep Windows on one HDD and put Linux on the other HDD.
2. I'll connect one of those HDDs to SATA port #1 on the motherboard.
3. Whatever HDD is connected to that port will always be the boot drive.
---
A. If I press escape during startup, I can select the other boot drive.
B. If I find myself doing that a lot, I'll swap SATA cables on the MB.

That's the simplest I think, and it doesn't require grub.
  #60  
Old February 28th 18, 05:37 PM posted to rec.photo.digital,alt.windows7.general
ultred ragnusen
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Posts: 92
Default A simple way to transfer photos from your phone to Windows without installing anything on either

Ken Blake wrote:

May I presume to ask if "any" RAID method is useful in the home
environment, where all you really care about is safety of your data?



Not as far as I'm concerned. You get safety through backup.\


I see that now, thanks.

The biggest problem with backup is that I have been burned by backing up to
HDD, which are sort of like having a battery backup to a battery, where
both suffer the same failings under the same conditions.

So I like to backup to DVD, which has the main problem of data being larger
than 4.7 GB in toto.

So the way I'll get around that will be to create a bunch of 4,482,269
kilobyte size-limited NTFS folders (using Veracrypt). Once any of those
folders gets filled with data, I'll burn it and move on to the next folder
(which keeps the data from growing too large for backup).

That's a KISS system that is as simple as possible given that I have no
desire for HDD backup because external HDDs suffer from even more problems
than do the internal HDDs.

I guess when SSDs are cheaper than DVD storage, they might be the next way
though, as long as they don't have proprietary power supplies because I
have some old HDDs that use proprietary cables which means they're useless
now, ten years later, when the power supply cable is lost or broken.
 




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