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A simple way to transfer photos from your phone to Windows without installing anything on either



 
 
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  #21  
Old February 24th 18, 05:25 PM posted to rec.photo.digital,alt.windows7.general
Paul[_10_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 50
Default A simple way to transfer photos from your phone to Windows withoutinstalling anything on either

David B. wrote:
On 24/02/2018 08:07, Mike S wrote:

You can do a startup repair and then a complete 10 repair install with
a free w10 dvd (you d/l the iso for).

w10 disk image
https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/soft...load/windows10


As I'm using a Mac, I was redirected to this URL to download the ISO:-

https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/soft...d/windows10ISO

Once I burn the ISO to a disk will it be 'bootable' or will additional
action be required first?


It requires dancing a jig on one foot.

When Windows is installed on more than a 100 million machines, would
distributing a broken image work ? How many people would ever
figure it out ?

If 100 million people phone the Microsoft support line with
"help me convert the ISO I downloaded into something useful",
how many Tier 0 employees do you think that's going to take
to help them out ? The telephone switch board will be absolutely jammed
for months and months.

Common sense tells you "it's supposed to work".

*******

Doing that from a Mac, comes with a risk. This risk also extends to
users on WinXP and Linux as well.

Downloads are handled two ways. On more modern platforms, BITS is
used to supervise the download (Microsoft gives you a stub EXE downloader
to use, and it calls BITS). The Microsoft servers seem to work
well with the BITS option. The stub downloader handles any post-processing
duties. A typical stub might be on the order of 5MB in size.

But a number of years back, regular HTTP downloads from the Microsoft
site, would become truncated during download. Sometimes around the
2GB mark, both ends of the transaction would just "stop" (no error message!).
And the ISO file would be ruined. You might not notice until you burned
the ISO, and maybe ImgBurn complained the structure wasn't right. I
saw this on Linux. I saw it on WinXP.

I got a number that way so I've actually experienced this first hand.
I detected them purely on size, before doing anything with the result.
But other download attempts ran to completion, just like normal.
The problem is intermittent.

This has also happened to other, non Windows 10 files. The bug
seemed to spread from the Windows distribution servers, into
other servers in the Microsoft CDN. The catalog server started
doing it. I got a bad 500MB Cumulative one day via HTTP.

You can convert an HTTP type download, into a BITS download via Powershell.
It's the Powershell equivalent of "wget". And it seems to work properly.
Why this makes a different, who can guess. A Linux user can't do this,
but someone on a Windows box could use it.

http://superuser.com/questions/36215...ows-powershell

(Start PowerShell, then try...)

Import-Module BitsTransfer === some older Windows maybe...
Start-BitsTransfer -source "http://urlToDownload"

where the URL to download would be pointing at the actual
file the catalog server is supposed to give you.

That's a way of converting an "unreliable" Microsoft
download, one where you were informed your download was
corrupted at some later point in time, into something
you can actually use.

Microsoft never admitted it was broken.

Microsoft never announced it was fixed.

Doing HTTP downloads from any other web site than a Microsoft
one, are not affected. It's not a networking stack problem
(especially as the bug is visible cross-platform).

A little trivia for you.

By all means, continue to download files via HTTP with your Mac.
But if the 2.5GB or 3.5GB ISO files seem "a tad short",
you have a place to start.

Even the breaking point in the download is not consistent.
It isn't a problem at exactly 2^31 for example. I did the
math on some of them, and no pattern of note emerged. And
it hardly ever breaks at the beginning.

Paul
  #22  
Old February 24th 18, 07:01 PM posted to rec.photo.digital,alt.windows7.general
ultred ragnusen
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 92
Default A simple way to transfer photos from your phone to Windows without installing anything on either

Mike S wrote:

You can do a startup repair and then a complete 10 repair install with a
free w10 dvd (you d/l the iso for).


This Windows 10 Pro update bricking happened just after the first reboot of
the system after 3 consecutive sets of daily failed Windows 10 software
updates on the 25th, 26th, and 27th of January.
http://wetakepic.com/images/2018/02/...update_010.jpg

w10 disk image
https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/soft...load/windows10


The Microsoft Tier2 telephone technical support (+1-800-642-7676) tried all
the Windows recovery options (save one) from the bricked boot disk, all of
which failed.
http://wetakepic.com/images/2018/02/...tup_repair.jpg

Microsoft telephone support also tried the same set of all but one recovery
options using a DVD that he downloaded and burned for me when I gave him
control over a good Windows 10 desktop.
http://wetakepic.com/images/2018/02/...dvd_repair.jpg

If you can't boot from the hdd, boot from the dvd and run the startup
repair.


That fails because Microsoft Windows 10 Pro update bricked the OS.
http://wetakepic.com/images/2018/02/24/reset_pc_02.jpg

If that is successful and you can boot from the hdd you can
reinstall all of the w10 system files while retaining your programs,
settings, and data, if needed.


I already bought a new HDD and installed Windows 10 Pro and even had
Microsoft Software Specialists install for me Office 2007 Pro over the
phone by taking over control of my system yesterday.

SOLVED: How to download an ISO image for Office 2007 Pro in the year 2018
https://groups.google.com/forum/#!to...al/7ru4_AyhPCY

http://wetakepic.com/images/2018/02/24/reset_pc_04.jpg

w10 repair install procedure
https://neosmart.net/wiki/windows-10...-installation/


The data is the only thing I care about since programs and operating
systems are all free (sort of) and readily available.

For the data, I'm trying the various methods (Knoppix, Testdisk, Recuva,
PhotoRec, DDRescue, etc.) all of which have much promise and where I saved
a lot of the data last night using Knoppix (although I ran into an issue
with "splicing" files that I need to resolve.

In addition, for the bricked operating system, I have an appointment at the
Microsoft Genius Bar over at the Westfield Mall in the middle of Silicon
Valley on Stevenscreek Blvd in Santa Clara (+1-408-454-5940) who have hours
from midnight to midnight so it's easy to make an appointment with them.

The good news, on topic for rec.photo.digital, is that I have been
transferring photos from the phone of the repair process over to the newly
installed Windows 10 Pro PC without any issues, either via WiFi pver the
LAN, Bluetooth over ad-hoc services, or over USB cable (it just works).
http://wetakepic.com/images/2018/02/24/6xt104k.jpg
  #23  
Old February 24th 18, 07:35 PM posted to rec.photo.digital,alt.windows7.general
ultred ragnusen
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 92
Default A simple way to transfer photos from your phone to Windows without installing anything on either

Paul wrote:

Once I burn the ISO to a disk will it be 'bootable' or will additional
action be required first?


It requires dancing a jig on one foot.


The Tier 2 Microsoft support person at +1-800-642-7676 took control of
another Windows 10 Pro system to download, burn, test, and run the same
sequence of repair that we ran (and failed at) using the bricked Windows 10
Pro recovery console.
http://wetakepic.com/images/2018/02/...dvd_repair.jpg

For the data, Knoppix worked just fine, but I am getting a very common
error from Knoppix on files that shouldn't have that error, where, when I
google for the error, NONE of the common causes can possibly be why I'm
getting that error.
Error splicing file: Value too large for defined data type.
http://wetakepic.com/images/2018/02/...x_error_01.jpg

The odd thing is that /all/ the root causes of that common error on the net
don't apply here, because the Knoppix boot alone exhibits the problem when
I copy the file to /tmp staying completely within the Knoppix file system
for the destination file.
http://wetakepic.com/images/2018/02/...x_error_02.jpg

On the net, the common reasons for that common error don't apply:
- It doesn't seem to be an NTFS issue since all the HDDs are NTFS
- It has nothing to do with the 4GB limit on file size

When Windows is installed on more than a 100 million machines, would
distributing a broken image work ? How many people would ever
figure it out ?


The second tier Microsoft support tech told me it's pretty common, saying
the reasons are many.
1. It could be a driver conflict
2. It could be a setup conflict
3. It could be a CPU conflict (the AMD CPUs were harder hit than Intel)
4. It could be a corrupted HDD (which is always a possibility)
5. It could be that I customized something that Microsoft didn't like
etc.

The Microsoft Genius Bar personnel (or whatever they're called) should be
able to allow me to tell you more when I go to my appointment.

If 100 million people phone the Microsoft support line with
"help me convert the ISO I downloaded into something useful",
how many Tier 0 employees do you think that's going to take
to help them out ? The telephone switch board will be absolutely jammed
for months and months.


I have to admit they spent at least an hour downloading, installing, and
activating Microsoft Office 2007 Pro yesterday, and a different tech spent
at least three hours trying to repair my bricked system. They will likely
spend a few more hours at the Microsoft Genius Bar (or whatever it's
called), where they'll have access to all the information in the support
ticket that has been filed to determine what the bug is due to.

I'll let you know more when I know more, but the net is that Knoppix was
the first data-recovery system I've tried, as per your suggestion to back
up the data BEFORE going to the Microsoft Genius Bar (or whatever it's
called). I'll try the other methods, where I'm confident that the data will
be recovered since there's nothing wrong with the hard disk drive as far as
I can tell.

http://wetakepic.com/images/2018/02/24/boot_device.jpg
  #24  
Old February 24th 18, 08:52 PM posted to rec.photo.digital,alt.windows7.general
Paul[_10_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 50
Default A simple way to transfer photos from your phone to Windows withoutinstalling anything on either

ultred ragnusen wrote:
Paul wrote:

Once I burn the ISO to a disk will it be 'bootable' or will additional
action be required first?

It requires dancing a jig on one foot.


The Tier 2 Microsoft support person at +1-800-642-7676 took control of
another Windows 10 Pro system to download, burn, test, and run the same
sequence of repair that we ran (and failed at) using the bricked Windows 10
Pro recovery console.
http://wetakepic.com/images/2018/02/...dvd_repair.jpg

For the data, Knoppix worked just fine, but I am getting a very common
error from Knoppix on files that shouldn't have that error, where, when I
google for the error, NONE of the common causes can possibly be why I'm
getting that error.
Error splicing file: Value too large for defined data type.
http://wetakepic.com/images/2018/02/...x_error_01.jpg


One series of threads I could find, blamed the cause on

Ubuntu is just not building gcc with -D_FILE_OFFSET_BITS=64

which causes 64-bit routines for file parameters to be use automatically.
You can declare such things discretely when programming, or
taking a legacy program and passing -D_FILE_OFFSET_BITS=64
helps in an attempt to fix them automatically.

*******

https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+s...ts/+bug/455122

The inode number in the example, is huge.

# on cifs mount...
19656 open("grape.c", O_RDONLY|O_NOCTTY) = 3
19656 fstat64(3, {st_dev=makedev(0, 23), st_ino=145241087983005616, === not a normal inode
st_mode=S_IFREG|0755, st_nlink=1, st_uid=3872,
st_gid=1000, st_blksize=16384, st_blocks=1, st_size=25,
st_atime=2009/10/18-19:13:16, st_mtime=2009/10/18-19:00:51,
st_ctime=2009/10/18-22:31:53}) = 0
19656 close(3) = 0

If we convert that number to hex, it's 0x020400000004AFB0.
It's remotely possible the inode number is actually 4AFB0
and the upper portion is "noise" from an uninitialized
stack parameter or memory location.

That's probably not the only root cause, but I wanted
to at least see an example of what they might be
complaining about.

In Linux, when NTFS is mounted, stat() results are faked
to make Linux "comfortable" with the IFS being mounted.
The Linux inode number, is actually formulated using
the #filenum of a file from $MFT. So the parameter in
fact, has a traceable origin. If you saw the errant
inode number in that case, you might be able to look up
in the $MFT, and see a "match" for the lower portion
of the number (the 4AFB0 part).

Since you say you're staying "on-platform" and not using
SAMBA/CIFS for this transfer, the result is highly
unusual. I've never seen this error in all the times
I've tried things with various Linux distros. I might
even be convinced to run a memory test as my first step
(memtest86+).

After the memtest completed one pass successfully,
I would change distros. And move on.

*******

The other possibility, is the source disk is damaged
somehow. But the way Windows handles filenum, it doesn't
allow the number to grow and grow. When you delete a file,
the "slot" is available for the next file creation. This
helps to keep the "epoch" of filenum values low. While
the filenum field is likely to be a large one (to suit
the declared maximum number of files that NTFS supports
in Wikipedia), users probably never see filenum
values remotely approaching the max_value.

On my Win10 C: drive with the build trees in the user folder,
the stats (as collected by the old Win2K era utility nfi.exe) are

Number of files: 1318185

Last file:

File 1341804

\Windows\servicing\Version\10.0.16299.245

So the highest #filenum (1341804) is not even remotely close
to being a 64 bit number in magnitude. And I don't even know
if a corruption on the source side could be interpreted that
way.

Paul
  #25  
Old February 25th 18, 01:40 AM posted to rec.photo.digital,alt.windows7.general
Mike S
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4
Default A simple way to transfer photos from your phone to Windowswithout installing anything on either

On 2/24/2018 11:01 AM, ultred ragnusen wrote:
Mike S wrote:

You can do a startup repair and then a complete 10 repair install with a
free w10 dvd (you d/l the iso for).


This Windows 10 Pro update bricking happened just after the first reboot of
the system after 3 consecutive sets of daily failed Windows 10 software
updates on the 25th, 26th, and 27th of January.
http://wetakepic.com/images/2018/02/...update_010.jpg

w10 disk image
https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/soft...load/windows10


The Microsoft Tier2 telephone technical support (+1-800-642-7676) tried all
the Windows recovery options (save one) from the bricked boot disk, all of
which failed.
http://wetakepic.com/images/2018/02/...tup_repair.jpg

Microsoft telephone support also tried the same set of all but one recovery
options using a DVD that he downloaded and burned for me when I gave him
control over a good Windows 10 desktop.
http://wetakepic.com/images/2018/02/...dvd_repair.jpg

If you can't boot from the hdd, boot from the dvd and run the startup
repair.


That fails because Microsoft Windows 10 Pro update bricked the OS.
http://wetakepic.com/images/2018/02/24/reset_pc_02.jpg

If that is successful and you can boot from the hdd you can
reinstall all of the w10 system files while retaining your programs,
settings, and data, if needed.


I already bought a new HDD and installed Windows 10 Pro and even had
Microsoft Software Specialists install for me Office 2007 Pro over the
phone by taking over control of my system yesterday.

SOLVED: How to download an ISO image for Office 2007 Pro in the year 2018
https://groups.google.com/forum/#!to...al/7ru4_AyhPCY

http://wetakepic.com/images/2018/02/24/reset_pc_04.jpg

w10 repair install procedure
https://neosmart.net/wiki/windows-10...-installation/


The data is the only thing I care about since programs and operating
systems are all free (sort of) and readily available.

For the data, I'm trying the various methods (Knoppix, Testdisk, Recuva,
PhotoRec, DDRescue, etc.) all of which have much promise and where I saved
a lot of the data last night using Knoppix (although I ran into an issue
with "splicing" files that I need to resolve.

In addition, for the bricked operating system, I have an appointment at the
Microsoft Genius Bar over at the Westfield Mall in the middle of Silicon
Valley on Stevenscreek Blvd in Santa Clara (+1-408-454-5940) who have hours
from midnight to midnight so it's easy to make an appointment with them.

The good news, on topic for rec.photo.digital, is that I have been
transferring photos from the phone of the repair process over to the newly
installed Windows 10 Pro PC without any issues, either via WiFi pver the
LAN, Bluetooth over ad-hoc services, or over USB cable (it just works).
http://wetakepic.com/images/2018/02/24/6xt104k.jpg

Apologies, I didn't read that you'd gone through all of that. Good luck.

  #26  
Old February 25th 18, 02:58 AM posted to rec.photo.digital,alt.windows7.general
Paul[_10_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 50
Default A simple way to transfer photos from your phone to Windows withoutinstalling anything on either

ultred ragnusen wrote:
Paul wrote:

Once I burn the ISO to a disk will it be 'bootable' or will additional
action be required first?

It requires dancing a jig on one foot.


The Tier 2 Microsoft support person at +1-800-642-7676 took control of
another Windows 10 Pro system to download, burn, test, and run the same
sequence of repair that we ran (and failed at) using the bricked Windows 10
Pro recovery console.
http://wetakepic.com/images/2018/02/...dvd_repair.jpg

For the data, Knoppix worked just fine, but I am getting a very common
error from Knoppix on files that shouldn't have that error, where, when I
google for the error, NONE of the common causes can possibly be why I'm
getting that error.
Error splicing file: Value too large for defined data type.
http://wetakepic.com/images/2018/02/...x_error_01.jpg

The odd thing is that /all/ the root causes of that common error on the net
don't apply here, because the Knoppix boot alone exhibits the problem when
I copy the file to /tmp staying completely within the Knoppix file system
for the destination file.
http://wetakepic.com/images/2018/02/...x_error_02.jpg

On the net, the common reasons for that common error don't apply:
- It doesn't seem to be an NTFS issue since all the HDDs are NTFS
- It has nothing to do with the 4GB limit on file size

When Windows is installed on more than a 100 million machines, would
distributing a broken image work ? How many people would ever
figure it out ?


The second tier Microsoft support tech told me it's pretty common, saying
the reasons are many.
1. It could be a driver conflict
2. It could be a setup conflict
3. It could be a CPU conflict (the AMD CPUs were harder hit than Intel)
4. It could be a corrupted HDD (which is always a possibility)
5. It could be that I customized something that Microsoft didn't like
etc.

The Microsoft Genius Bar personnel (or whatever they're called) should be
able to allow me to tell you more when I go to my appointment.

If 100 million people phone the Microsoft support line with
"help me convert the ISO I downloaded into something useful",
how many Tier 0 employees do you think that's going to take
to help them out ? The telephone switch board will be absolutely jammed
for months and months.


I have to admit they spent at least an hour downloading, installing, and
activating Microsoft Office 2007 Pro yesterday, and a different tech spent
at least three hours trying to repair my bricked system. They will likely
spend a few more hours at the Microsoft Genius Bar (or whatever it's
called), where they'll have access to all the information in the support
ticket that has been filed to determine what the bug is due to.

I'll let you know more when I know more, but the net is that Knoppix was
the first data-recovery system I've tried, as per your suggestion to back
up the data BEFORE going to the Microsoft Genius Bar (or whatever it's
called). I'll try the other methods, where I'm confident that the data will
be recovered since there's nothing wrong with the hard disk drive as far as
I can tell.

http://wetakepic.com/images/2018/02/24/boot_device.jpg


I had another think about this, and the first question I've
got is

What utility is this ? "Finished" box.

http://wetakepic.com/images/2018/02/...x_error_01.jpg

I tried to match that dialog with some searches but was not
successful. Since Google has ruined some of their search tools
in the name of the Getty legal challenge, I can't even enter a
snip of the orange triangle and try to get a match on that.

I see a dialog box with the word "Finished" but I can't tell what
utility put that dialog box there.

I'm beginning to think you're running a scavenger, one that scans
through the disk for recognizable file headers and tries to
reconstruct files. Such tools, will produce a hundred thousand
useless unnamed fragments of files, if given a chance.
(I know, because I tried going through a folder of such
fragments once, and it was a total waste of time.)

So maybe before I jump to conclusions inappropriate for the
situation, I need some context, like what utility did that.

I don't think the "splicing" error is that bogus error based
on fstat or fstat64, and instead, it's a utility that does
actual splicing. Such utilities locate clusters of fragmented
files, they somehow conclude the disparate clusters belong
together and slap them together.

When you use "undelete" utilities (i.e. what you shouldn't
be using in this case), those take advantage of the fact the
slot for a file, only has one byte flipped indicating the
file is deleted. This leaves lots of information for reconstruction.
Including info about what clusters are used for the file. If the
(old, deleted) file does not "collide" with any new usage of the
disk resources, the undelete utility gives a "good" status for the
file, meaning "if I recover it for you, the file will be complete".
And that status is possible, because of the nature of the situation.

However, if the $MFT is lost, scanning through a fragmented disk
trying to do stuff based purely on file headers, is doomed from the
start. And that's a kind of scavenger behavior (i.e. not an undelete
utility). Can it take advantage of the $MFT ? It could certainly try.
That's if it can find the $MFT.

So maybe by context, it can tell there are too many clusters, or
the file it's reconstructing no longer makes sense (the series
of 4CC codes doesn't look right). Maybe a file type has a length
parameter, and the length parameter doesn't match the number
of clusters being spliced to rebuild the file.

Paul
  #27  
Old February 25th 18, 04:43 AM posted to rec.photo.digital,alt.windows7.general
nospam
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 21,584
Default A simple way to transfer photos from your phone to Windows without installing anything on either

In article , Paul
wrote:

I'm beginning to think you're running a scavenger, one that scans
through the disk for recognizable file headers and tries to
reconstruct files. Such tools, will produce a hundred thousand
useless unnamed fragments of files, if given a chance.
(I know, because I tried going through a folder of such
fragments once, and it was a total waste of time.)


maybe the tools you used didn't work well. the better tools not only
find the names, but also the file/folder hierarchy, and can reconstruct
as much as it can.
  #28  
Old February 27th 18, 03:03 AM posted to rec.photo.digital,alt.windows7.general
ultred ragnusen
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 92
Default A simple way to transfer photos from your phone to Windows without installing anything on either

Paul wrote:

One series of threads I could find, blamed the cause on

Ubuntu is just not building gcc with -D_FILE_OFFSET_BITS=64

which causes 64-bit routines for file parameters to be use automatically.


Hmmmmmmmmm.... thanks for finding that Paul, which may mean that I
accidentally used a 32-bit Knoppix. I will have to check the Knoppix
because I didn't write on the DVD disc whether it was 32-bit or 64-bit
where I got Knoppix from this torrent.
http://torrent.unix-ag.uni-kl.de:6969/

Since you say you're staying "on-platform" and not using
SAMBA/CIFS for this transfer, the result is highly
unusual.


Yup. No big deal though, because I bought a SATA III 6GB SATA cable plus a
4-pin Molex male to dual SATA female set of cables today, and now have
/both/ HDDs in the desktop where Windows is booting from SATA1 and the DVD
drive is on SATA2 with the bad boot HDD on SATA3..
http://wetakepic.com/images/2018/02/...a_cables_1.jpg

The bad-boot HDD seems to show up just fine in Windows as a non-boot data
drive, so I shouldn't need Knoppix, which I only used because I wanted to
back up my data BEFORE giving it to the Microsoft Retail Store genius bar
employees to fix.
http://wetakepic.com/images/2018/02/...ystem8f091.jpg

I've never seen this error in all the times
I've tried things with various Linux distros. I might
even be convinced to run a memory test as my first step
(memtest86+).


The Microsoft Genius Bar retail store employees said they checked
everything, and it all checked out fine (memory, HDD, etc.). It was just
bricked. I asked specifically what they did, and they said they ran machine
diagnostics first, and then they booted to the X: drive (as we did in the
past) where they ran something they called bcdedit, fixboot, & scanos.

They said they tried to fix the master boot record (fixboot) and even tried
older versions of Windows 10 in addition to the Fall Creator's Update.

After the memtest completed one pass successfully,
I would change distros. And move on.


I have the problem mostly solved since the Microsoft genius bar employees
couldn't get it to boot, so, the updated and bricked Windows 10 Pro OS is a
write off but everything else appears to be fine.
http://wetakepic.com/images/2018/02/...il_store_1.jpg

Thanks for all your kind and expert help. It turns out that the OS was
bricked by the late January Microsoft Windows 10 Pro Update, where two
different employees at the store (once when I dropped it off, and again
when I picked it up, asking the same question) told me they get this at
least once a day, sometimes a few times a day, so it's pretty common in the
real world for a Windows 10 Update to brick the system.
  #29  
Old February 27th 18, 03:17 AM posted to rec.photo.digital,alt.windows7.general
ultred ragnusen
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 92
Default A simple way to transfer photos from your phone to Windows without installing anything on either

Paul wrote:

I had another think about this, and the first question I've
got is

What utility is this ? "Finished" box.

http://wetakepic.com/images/2018/02/...x_error_01.jpg


Oh. That. It's simply the dialog that Knoppix gives you when you select a
directory to right click and "copy" and then you select a location to right
click and "paste".

Anyway, I picked up the machine from the Microsoft Store today where they
found nothing wrong with the HDD or memory, but they couldn't recover the
operating system. I asked them what they ran and they spit off a bunch of
words (fixboot, scanos, chkdsk, diskpart) but mostly they said they used
"bcdedit" after running full diagnostics on the HDD and RAM and
motherboard.
http://wetakepic.com/images/2018/02/...il_store_2.jpg

I see a dialog box with the word "Finished" but I can't tell what
utility put that dialog box there.


It's just the normal copy and paste of Knoppix.
But it's all over. The Microsoft Update bricked OS is a goner because I
tried both Microsoft telephone support and the retail store in the middle
of Silicon Valley (right across from the Apple store).
http://wetakepic.com/images/2018/02/...il_store_3.jpg

The bricked MS Windows 10 update is just a disk drive now.
Windows seems to mount it just fine once I bought a SATA III cable and a
molex-to-SATA connector to hook it up as a second HDD.
http://wetakepic.com/images/2018/02/...e_system_2.jpg
(BTW, I have no idea what that 100GB "system reserved" partition is as I
didn't make it to my knowledge.)
  #30  
Old February 27th 18, 03:27 AM posted to rec.photo.digital,alt.windows7.general
ultred ragnusen
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 92
Default A simple way to transfer photos from your phone to Windows without installing anything on either

nospam wrote:

maybe the tools you used didn't work well. the better tools not only
find the names, but also the file/folder hierarchy, and can reconstruct
as much as it can.


The whole saga is over and done with since Microsoft can't recover the
operating system they, themselves, bricked, and where two different
Microsoft Retail store employees told me this is very common, where they
get a system bricked by the Windows 10 update at least once a day.

Interestingly, the Microsoft retail store in the middle of Silicon Valley
is directly across the aisle from the Apple Sto
http://wetakepic.com/images/2018/02/...il_store_1.jpg

The Microsoft store is almost a direct copy of the Apple model, as far as I
can tell, only about twice the size.
http://wetakepic.com/images/2018/02/...il_store_5.jpg

But, in both cases, I've never had any success bringing anything to either
the Microsoft or Apple "genius" employees, who seem to know far less than
you guys do (because they always fail - and I only bring the hard problems
to them because that's when I failed too).
http://wetakepic.com/images/2018/02/...il_store_1.jpg

PS: The Microsoft Store feeds you though, while the Apple store does not.

 




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