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A simple way to transfer photos from your phone to Windows without installing anything on either



 
 
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  #11  
Old February 24th 18, 03:04 AM posted to rec.photo.digital,alt.windows7.general
Paul[_10_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 50
Default A simple way to transfer photos from your phone to Windows withoutinstalling anything on either

nospam wrote:
In article , Wolf K
wrote:

If your system can't recognise the drive, you'll have to take it to a
tech shop that specialises in data recovery.


false. there are recovery utilities that do not require a mountable
file system.


If you cannot get an identity string at BIOS level, it's dead.

I think that's what Wolf is referring to.

Paul
  #12  
Old February 24th 18, 03:16 AM posted to rec.photo.digital,alt.windows7.general
nospam
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 21,698
Default A simple way to transfer photos from your phone to Windows without installing anything on either

In article , Paul
wrote:

If your system can't recognise the drive, you'll have to take it to a
tech shop that specialises in data recovery.


false. there are recovery utilities that do not require a mountable
file system.


If you cannot get an identity string at BIOS level, it's dead.


then don't use a system that uses bios, a system that doesn't have such
a ridiculous limitation.

I think that's what Wolf is referring to.


i don't know what he's referring to, but the statement as written is
false.
  #13  
Old February 24th 18, 04:37 AM posted to rec.photo.digital,alt.windows7.general
ultred ragnusen
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Posts: 92
Default A simple way to transfer photos from your phone to Windows without installing anything on either

Paul wrote:

Do you think Microsoft Support phone numbers will handle a call on Win 10
corruption due to the Microsoft Update?


They might.


Today the Microsoft Support Tier 2 technician tried to "repair" the Windows
10 Pro HDD that Microsoft Windows Update bricked about a month ago.
http://wetakepic.com/images/2018/02/24/4xt104h.jpg

They failed. It took /hours/, where the 2nd tier Microsoft Technical
Support (+1-800-642-7676) stuck with me the entire time.
http://wetakepic.com/images/2018/02/24/4xt104i.jpg

Since the OS wouldn't boot, screenshots were out of the question.

So I snapped scores of new photos with the spare Moto G Android phone of
exactly the procedure Microsoft followed during the hours it took to fail,
and I transferred those photos to this computer using the "it just works"
method described in this thread.
http://wetakepic.com/images/2018/02/24/4xt104g.jpg

Are you willing to let them remote in ?


Yes. I already physically replaced the HDD that Microsoft Update bricked,
which needed Office 2007 Pro, where Microsoft Technical Support
(+1-800-360-7561) remotely installed and activated MS Office for me earlier
today.
http://wetakepic.com/images/2018/02/...ice2007_16.jpg

They remoted into my machine in order for them to manually install
Microsoft Office 2007 Pro for me earlier today, all the steps of which are
fully documented in screenshots for group tribal knowledge here.

SOLVED: How to download an ISO image for Office 2007 Pro in the year 2018
https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/microsoft.public.windowsxp.general/7ru4_AyhPCY

Some people value their privacy more than they value a "repair".


All I care about is my data, where they would be bored to tears if they
looked at it - but my data is important to me (pictures of the grandkids,
financial records, thousands of DIY photos, etc.).

I let Microsoft remote in a second time today because they needed to create
a bootable media for me on a known-good computer, we created 1709 bootable
DVD media to attempt to repair the bricked Microsoft Windows 10 Pro.
http://wetakepic.com/images/2018/02/24/6xt104j.jpg

Can you explain, succinctly, to the person on the phone,
what you did to the disk right after the incident ?


Hmmm... I'm not known to be laconic.
I explained that I hit /every/ button that the recovery console provided
/except/ the one that wipes out everything and reinstalls Windows 10 Pro.

In other words, things that might have complicated the situation.


The only thing I did that might complicate things is the DISM command you
suggested, where the 2nd tier support at Microsoft told me that they never
use DISM on a system that doesn't already boot.

I don't remember what the DISM command was that I used, but we documented
it in a prior psot so I can dig it up (they didn't seem to care since that
X:\ command prompt is the one step they never use, they told me.

You may have tried that DISM command to back out
a half-finished update. That might have been one of them.
Maybe it was "revert" something-or-other. The first command is
to back out a patch that didn't actually install. The second
one would be backing out a patch that did install.

DISM /image:c:\ /cleanup-image /revertpendingactions
DISM /image:c:\ /remove-package /_packagename_


Yup. I ran whatever DISM you had suggested at the time, but they told me
that DISM won't do anything on a system that won't boot except to the
recovery console.

On a damaged disk, "CHKDSK" is a "repair-in-place" utility.
You *must* make a backup before using it, or possibly
forever lose access to the data. CHKDSK is *not* a utility
for casual usage.


You can't run CHKDSK if the disk won't mount.

It's perfectly safe when the disk is
healthy... and quite deadly when the disk is sick.


There's nothing wrong with the disk (AFAIK).

It's the Microsoft Update that bricked it. I suspect it's because I
customized the hell out of that system, to the point that Microsoft Updates
didn't work at all until recently. Then wham! Windows Update bricked the
system.

The tech support said it's because the HP machine I'm using doesn't have
drivers from HP for Win10 but I suspect it's just poor coding that can't
handle customizations.

Lesson learned - don't customize Windows 10 Pro too much.

It's a paradox to be resolved by creating a backup before you
use it. Even the twit on the phone should know that.


There's no way to make a backup if you can't "mount" the data.
(I see your suggestion for ddrescue below... see below for details.)

We ended up making a support appointment at the nearest Microsoft Support
Center, which, in the Silicon Valley, is open the strangest hours!
Monday = Midnight to Midnight
Tuesday = Noon to 9:30PM
Wednesday = 10am to Midnight
Thursday = 10 am to 9:30 PM
Friday = 10 am to 9:30 PM
Saturday = 10 am to 9:30 PM
Sunday = Closed

Before you allow a twit to work on that disk, you
back it up. In case my little description didn't paint
a vivid enough picture for you.


I can't imagine how to back up a disk that can't be mounted.
(I see your suggestion for ddrescue below... see below for details.)

As you know, I plugged it into an SATA/IDE/PATA adapter but a known good
Windows 10 computer wouldn't mount it.
http://wetakepic.com/images/2018/02/...sb_adapter.jpg

Even when you take a computer to the computer store or
to Geek Squad for repair, you back it up first!!!


How do you back up a terabyte HDD that won't mount?
(I see your suggestion for ddrescue below... see below for details.)

No exceptions. You can use ddrescue for this, if you cannot
find anything else to use.


Googling for "ddrescue" canonical site, it looks like it's dead:
https://sourceforge.net/projects/ddrescueview/

Maybe the GNU link is the canonical site?
http://www.gnu.org/software/ddrescue/

It's a gunzipped tarball, so I'll deal with that.

Seems to have some associated utilities but they don't work on Windows.
DDRescue-GUI - A simple GUI (Graphical User Interface) for ddrescue.
http://www.hamishmb.altervista.org/h...e=ddrescue-gui

And they're dead links anyway:
Ddrescueview - A graphical viewer for GNU ddrescue log files.
http://sourceforge.net/projects/ddrescueview/

Ddrutility - A set of tools designed to work with ddrescue to aid with data
recovery.
http://sourceforge.net/projects/ddrutility/

I'll read up s'more on ddrescue. Thanks. We should probably take this out
of the r.p.d ng because it's off topic so I'll post a separate thread.
  #14  
Old February 24th 18, 05:11 AM posted to rec.photo.digital,alt.windows7.general
ultred ragnusen
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Posts: 92
Default A simple way to transfer photos from your phone to Windows without installing anything on either

Wolf K wrote:

Do you think Microsoft Support phone numbers will handle a call on Win 10
corruption due to the Microsoft Update?


I doubt it, but always worth a try.


Turns out that Microsoft Tier 2 tech support (+1-800-642-7676) walks you
through all the steps to try to recover a system bricked by Windows Update.

1. First they walk you through all the recovery options on the HDD itself,
2. Then they create a bootable DVD for you if you have another system,
3. Then they walk you through those same options using the bootable DVD

The recovery at #1 and #3 failed so I have an appointment at a Microsoft
Store in the middle of Silicon Valley, since I have to be at the convention
center the rest of the week anyway.

For recovering data off a trashed HDD: Does Windows recognise it, ie,
assign a drive letter?


Nope. I tried two things that would work with most bricked systems.
A. It won't boot except to the blue Windows recovery consoles, and,
B. It isn't recognized except as an unknown USB drive when plugged into an
SATA adapter I bought at the local Silicon Valley Fryes for this purpose.
http://wetakepic.com/images/2018/02/...sb_adapter.jpg

The even if Win can't read the data, you should
be able to get it.


Yup. You're correct. If some kind of recovery tool could "mount" the drive,
I'd be home free. I haven't tried a Linux rescue CD because my Linux laptop
fan died and I haven't replaced the fan yet.

I recommend Recuva, which I've used with great success.


Thanks for that suggestion, where I googled for the canonical Recuva
location, which seems to be the Ccleaner site:
http://www.ccleaner.com/recuva
https://www.ccleaner.com/recuva/download

There are other data recovery programs, other people will no
doubt give their recommendations.


I will follow your advice, and that of Paul, by backing up what I can, but
one issue with a dd command is that the new disk is 1TB while the old disk
is 1TB so it's not going to work unless I buy a third HDD of at least 1TB.

There are also Linux-based tools, which can be run off a live CD, but as
with Windows, Linux has to be able to recognise it (mount it).


Thanks for that suggestion. Googling, I found Knoppix live DVD software
http://knoppix.net/
which has a bit torrent mechanism for faster downloading:
http://torrent.unix-ag.uni-kl.de:6969/

KNOPPIX_V8.1-2017-09-05-EN
http://torrent.unix-ag.uni-kl.de/sta...a 0170753eec6

Since this is a brand new Win10 Pro installation, I had to dig up a bit
torrent client to use since the one recommended and linked to on the
Knoppix site above is a dead link:
http://bitconjurer.org/BitTorrent/download.html

So I downloaded and installed uTorrent, which I've used in the past for
Linux ISO downloads to use within Windows inside VirtualBox.
http://www.utorrent.com/downloads/co.../stable/os/win

If your system can't recognise the drive, you'll have to take it to a
tech shop that specialises in data recovery.


Since I'll be in San Jose, Sunnyvale, Cupertino, Mountainview, and Santa
Clara all this week, I already have an appointment at the Microsoft Store
at Westfield Valley Fair, 2855 Stevenscreek Blvd, Suite 1135, 2nd floor,
+1-408-454-5940
  #15  
Old February 24th 18, 07:17 AM posted to rec.photo.digital,alt.windows7.general
Paul[_10_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 50
Default A simple way to transfer photos from your phone to Windows withoutinstalling anything on either

ultred ragnusen wrote:


I'll read up s'more on ddrescue. Thanks. We should probably take this out
of the r.p.d ng because it's off topic so I'll post a separate thread.


If you have something like Ubuntu, try "gddrescue".

The package name and the executable name, don't have
to be the same. That's what adds to the joy of figuring it out.

ddrescue is a utility that tolerates "CRC error" when reading
a disk. You can make one run after another, and the "log" file
keeps track of what sectors have not been recovered yet. Looking
at the log, you get some idea how much damage remains (in terms
of CRC errors).

The items are

source disk
destination disk
log file

You present the same log file to the tool, every time you
run the same source and dest. The log file gets updated when
hard-to-read sectors are finally captured. Eventually, after
enough passes, there will be some sectors that will never be
read. And you hope that those are replaced by zeros. Then,
if you run CHKDSK on that destination drive, it might be
able to restore enough of the disk, to get (most) of the
data off it.

ddrescue is mechanical and captures sectors. It doesn't know
or care whether the partition is NTFS or EXT4. Doesn't matter.

It relies on other tools, to make sense of what it captured.

The "logical" state of the file system is another matter
entirely. For example, my Windows 10 Insider partition that
had volume bitmap corruption and some damage to Extended Attributes,
I could use ddrescue on that hard drive, and it would complete
the transfer in only one pass (the log file would be clean).
No second pass would be needed. But in order to correct the
damage on the disk, it takes a couple CHKDSK commands to finish
the job.

I don't really care all that much, what happens to my
Windows 10 Insider installs, as Windows 10 is the "software
as a service" OS, and it should "run like a King". It's
simply not possible for a product like that, to be bricked...
Right ? :-/

This would be an example of backing up a hard drive, to an
"image file". The "image file" could be restored to a new hard
drive later, say. The "S" argument in this example is sparse.
For experiments of this kind, I can prepare /dev/sdb in advance
to contain mostly zeroed data files. When the backup is
written out, it need not take much space on the storage
device. This allows backup experiments with only a small amount
of real space on the destination. I think the -b parameter
sets the max transfer size. The command is adaptive and
adjusts the block transfer according to how "bad" the disk
is. The block size is increased, as long as it improves the
overall transfer rate. If the fastest transfer is happening with
4KB blocks, then it'll use 4KB transfers instead.

ddrescue -S -b8M /dev/sdb /mount/external/backup/sdb.raw /mount/external/backup/sdb.log

Because there was nothing wrong with the disk, I had no real
opportunity to craft a "second pass" command for it. So that
command is for the first pass. You can open the log in a
text editor, and see what remains to be transferred and whether
another pass is required.

Paul
  #16  
Old February 24th 18, 07:45 AM posted to rec.photo.digital,alt.windows7.general
ultred ragnusen
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 92
Default A simple way to transfer photos from your phone to Windows without installing anything on either

Paul wrote:

I'll read up s'more on ddrescue. Thanks. We should probably take this out
of the r.p.d ng because it's off topic so I'll post a separate thread.


If you have something like Ubuntu, try "gddrescue".


The fan died on my Ubuntu 16.04 laptop, but I can torrent the Ubuntu ISO
and boot off of it or even re-install VirtualBox (although it took a long
time before I had VirtualBox working on the original HDD).

I did torrent Knoppix though and burned it to a bootable DVD image,
although even with almost 2,500 peers, it still took a long while to
torrent.
http://wetakepic.com/images/2018/02/24/knoppix1.jpg

The package name and the executable name, don't have
to be the same. That's what adds to the joy of figuring it out.


I think I'll try Knoppix first, and then, perhaps Recuva, where your advice
to back up the data /before/ handing the desktop tower to Microsoft is good
advice.

ddrescue is a utility that tolerates "CRC error" when reading
a disk. You can make one run after another, and the "log" file
keeps track of what sectors have not been recovered yet. Looking
at the log, you get some idea how much damage remains (in terms
of CRC errors).


Personally, I don't think there is any /damage/ to the HDD; I think it's as
simple as Microsoft Windows Update screwed up, perhaps because I had
customized the heck out of the system (Winaero, Classic Shell, etc.).

ddrescue is mechanical and captures sectors. It doesn't know
or care whether the partition is NTFS or EXT4. Doesn't matter.


Thanks for the ddrescue advice. I'm not sure yet if it's a standalone
bootable tool or something that runs inside of Windows or Linux but I'll
work it out after trying out Knoppix with the bad HDD connected via the
SATA adapter to the USB port on the desktop booted to Knoppix.
http://wetakepic.com/images/2018/02/24/knoppix2.jpg
  #17  
Old February 24th 18, 08:07 AM posted to rec.photo.digital,alt.windows7.general
Mike S
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4
Default A simple way to transfer photos from your phone to Windowswithout installing anything on either

On 2/23/2018 9:11 PM, ultred ragnusen wrote:
Wolf K wrote:

Do you think Microsoft Support phone numbers will handle a call on Win 10
corruption due to the Microsoft Update?


I doubt it, but always worth a try.


Turns out that Microsoft Tier 2 tech support (+1-800-642-7676) walks you
through all the steps to try to recover a system bricked by Windows Update.

1. First they walk you through all the recovery options on the HDD itself,
2. Then they create a bootable DVD for you if you have another system,
3. Then they walk you through those same options using the bootable DVD

The recovery at #1 and #3 failed so I have an appointment at a Microsoft
Store in the middle of Silicon Valley, since I have to be at the convention
center the rest of the week anyway.

For recovering data off a trashed HDD: Does Windows recognise it, ie,
assign a drive letter?


Nope. I tried two things that would work with most bricked systems.
A. It won't boot except to the blue Windows recovery consoles, and,
B. It isn't recognized except as an unknown USB drive when plugged into an
SATA adapter I bought at the local Silicon Valley Fryes for this purpose.
http://wetakepic.com/images/2018/02/...sb_adapter.jpg

The even if Win can't read the data, you should
be able to get it.


Yup. You're correct. If some kind of recovery tool could "mount" the drive,
I'd be home free. I haven't tried a Linux rescue CD because my Linux laptop
fan died and I haven't replaced the fan yet.

I recommend Recuva, which I've used with great success.


Thanks for that suggestion, where I googled for the canonical Recuva
location, which seems to be the Ccleaner site:
http://www.ccleaner.com/recuva
https://www.ccleaner.com/recuva/download

There are other data recovery programs, other people will no
doubt give their recommendations.


I will follow your advice, and that of Paul, by backing up what I can, but
one issue with a dd command is that the new disk is 1TB while the old disk
is 1TB so it's not going to work unless I buy a third HDD of at least 1TB.

There are also Linux-based tools, which can be run off a live CD, but as
with Windows, Linux has to be able to recognise it (mount it).


Thanks for that suggestion. Googling, I found Knoppix live DVD software
http://knoppix.net/
which has a bit torrent mechanism for faster downloading:
http://torrent.unix-ag.uni-kl.de:6969/

KNOPPIX_V8.1-2017-09-05-EN
http://torrent.unix-ag.uni-kl.de/sta...a 0170753eec6

Since this is a brand new Win10 Pro installation, I had to dig up a bit
torrent client to use since the one recommended and linked to on the
Knoppix site above is a dead link:
http://bitconjurer.org/BitTorrent/download.html

So I downloaded and installed uTorrent, which I've used in the past for
Linux ISO downloads to use within Windows inside VirtualBox.
http://www.utorrent.com/downloads/co.../stable/os/win

If your system can't recognise the drive, you'll have to take it to a
tech shop that specialises in data recovery.


Since I'll be in San Jose, Sunnyvale, Cupertino, Mountainview, and Santa
Clara all this week, I already have an appointment at the Microsoft Store
at Westfield Valley Fair, 2855 Stevenscreek Blvd, Suite 1135, 2nd floor,
+1-408-454-5940


You can do a startup repair and then a complete 10 repair install with a
free w10 dvd (you d/l the iso for).

w10 disk image
https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/soft...load/windows10

If you can't boot from the hdd, boot from the dvd and run the startup
repair. If that is successful and you can boot from the hdd you can
reinstall all of the w10 system files while retaining your programs,
settings, and data, if needed.

w10 repair install procedure
https://neosmart.net/wiki/windows-10...-installation/
  #18  
Old February 24th 18, 09:03 AM posted to rec.photo.digital,alt.windows7.general
Carlos E.R.
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 129
Default A simple way to transfer photos from your phone to Windowswithout installing anything on either

On 2018-02-22 19:42, ultred ragnusen wrote:
Wolf K wrote:

AFAIK, Windows sees all USB-connected cameras, including phones. But
unlike USB flash-drives, they do not have to be Removed. Just unplug
them when you're done.


THANK YOU for that hint!

I hope it's true, because it's a pain to have to wait to shut it down
first, but where I've had to laboriously recover (e.g., Recuva) data big
time by not shutting down the drive with USB HDD drives after copying over
large amounts of data.

So it's nice to know (if it's true) that you can just unplug a phone
without worry of data corruption.


Not entirely true.

There will not be filesystem corruption, but if a file was being written
it will be incomplete (and possibly deleted). And if there is a bunch of
files waiting to be transferred, they won't. Going through the motions
of secure removal will ensure all the files are written.

MTP does file by file individual and complete operations.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Media_Transfer_Protocol

--
Cheers, Carlos.
  #19  
Old February 24th 18, 09:14 AM posted to rec.photo.digital,alt.windows7.general
Paul[_10_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 50
Default A simple way to transfer photos from your phone to Windows withoutinstalling anything on either

ultred ragnusen wrote:
Paul wrote:

I'll read up s'more on ddrescue. Thanks. We should probably take this out
of the r.p.d ng because it's off topic so I'll post a separate thread.

If you have something like Ubuntu, try "gddrescue".


The fan died on my Ubuntu 16.04 laptop, but I can torrent the Ubuntu ISO
and boot off of it or even re-install VirtualBox (although it took a long
time before I had VirtualBox working on the original HDD).

I did torrent Knoppix though and burned it to a bootable DVD image,
although even with almost 2,500 peers, it still took a long while to
torrent.
http://wetakepic.com/images/2018/02/24/knoppix1.jpg

The package name and the executable name, don't have
to be the same. That's what adds to the joy of figuring it out.


I think I'll try Knoppix first, and then, perhaps Recuva, where your advice
to back up the data /before/ handing the desktop tower to Microsoft is good
advice.

ddrescue is a utility that tolerates "CRC error" when reading
a disk. You can make one run after another, and the "log" file
keeps track of what sectors have not been recovered yet. Looking
at the log, you get some idea how much damage remains (in terms
of CRC errors).


Personally, I don't think there is any /damage/ to the HDD; I think it's as
simple as Microsoft Windows Update screwed up, perhaps because I had
customized the heck out of the system (Winaero, Classic Shell, etc.).

ddrescue is mechanical and captures sectors. It doesn't know
or care whether the partition is NTFS or EXT4. Doesn't matter.


Thanks for the ddrescue advice. I'm not sure yet if it's a standalone
bootable tool or something that runs inside of Windows or Linux but I'll
work it out after trying out Knoppix with the bad HDD connected via the
SATA adapter to the USB port on the desktop booted to Knoppix.
http://wetakepic.com/images/2018/02/24/knoppix2.jpg


Since the disk is "suspected good" at the hardware level,
you can use "dd" on it. Knoppix will have a copy. Every Linux
distro has "dd" on it. The "dd" utility does not tolerate CRC
errors like gddrescue does. Which is fine with your hard drive.

sudo dd if=/dev/sda of=/media/sparedrive/bigdisk.bin bs=512 count=...

That's the general format for storing every sector on a hard
drive, as a "very large file" stored on a second disk.

If you have two 1TB drives, then obviously when you make the
/media/sparedrive partition, it will be slightly smaller than
the thing you are copying.

However, sometimes partitions support compression. You can
also chain commands together in the command line.

Adjust the arithmetic product of blocksize and count parameters,
so the entire disk is copied. Unlike gddrescue with its adaptive
transfer scheme, "dd" expects you to do the math and copy
as much or as little of the drive as you'd like. For example,
the second command here would transfer around 1.2GB or so.

sudo dd if=/dev/sda bs=512 count=12345678 | gzip -3 /media/sparedrive/bigdisk.bin.gz

sudo dd if=/dev/sda bs=1048576 count=1234 | gzip -3 /media/sparedrive/bigdisk.bin.gz

Since you're in Linux, you can try...

sudo fdisk /dev/sda

and get size info for the disk. Then, use the factor program,
to see what number makes a good fit for blocksize "bs" parameter.
(bs * count) must equal the total size info you got.

factor 123456789

*******

Let's try an example. This is a disk sitting on my Test Machine.

[email protected]:~$ sudo fdisk /dev/sda

Welcome to fdisk (util-linux 2.27.1).
Changes will remain in memory only, until you decide to write them.
Be careful before using the write command.

Command (m for help): p
Disk /dev/sda: 477 GiB, 512110190592 bytes, 1000215216 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disklabel type: dos
Disk identifier: 0x72ca3ed1

Now I type "q" to quit, and move on to the next command.

[email protected]:~$ factor 512110190592
512110190592: 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 3 7 11 13 257
[email protected]:~$

2^13 = 8192, which is a pretty small block size. Some newer
drives will run at the sustained transfer rate, even with that
small of a block size parameter. What I can do, is throw in
3^3 to make it a bit larger. 2^13 * 3^3 = 221184 bytes.

Dividing 512110190592 by 221184, completes the job (2315313)

To copy my 500GB specimen, I'd use

sudo dd if=/dev/sda of=/media/sparedrive/bigdisk.bin bs=221184 count=2315313

knowing that I'm getting every sector of the source. If the
destination drive is slightly too small, I have the option
of piping the output into a compression command of some sort.
There's possibly a p7zip-full package and a command line 7zip invocation
to achieve a higher compression ratio. But it would be
significantly slower.

There is also the pigz package, which is like gzip only it allows
more than one CPU core to be used. The ZIP that 7ZIP does, uses
a single core by comparison, when compressing. Some other 7ZIP
formats, use multiple cores.

sudo dd if=/dev/sda bs=221184 count=2315313 | pigz -3 -p 4 out.bin.gz

Anyway, I'm sure you'll figure out something.

To restore the disk later, it would be something like

unpigz -c out.bin.gz | sudo dd of=/dev/sda bs=221184 count=2315313

On some platforms, you can use if=- to stand for "stdin" and
of=- for "stdout". But it's also possible the command understands
the piping situation and the "missing" portion of the command,
to mean the same thing. That's why my last command doesn't have
an input file specification.

To do something like this (i.e. not specify if= and of=),
it's going to copy stdin to stdout.

cat sample.bin | dd destination.bin

If I wanted to be more explicit I could do this

cat sample.bin | dd if=- of=- destination.bin

or even

cat sample.bin | dd if=- of=destination.bin

would copy the file in chunks of 512 bytes. The pipe symbol has
a buffer which is larger than that, so the chunks are probably
of no consequence. Running dd with default bs=512 is usually
pretty slow and only does around 13MB/sec.

*******

There's also things like clonezilla. For example, making an exact
copy of one terabyte disk to a second terabyte disk. Sometimes you
get lucky, and they're the same size. Since you have the
sudo fdisk command to check the exact size of each drive, you
can check the drives before deciding what to do. I've not used
clonezilla, so cannot give a rundown on any "tricks".

https://www.addictivetips.com/ubuntu...ll-clonezilla/

Paul
  #20  
Old February 24th 18, 09:25 AM posted to rec.photo.digital,alt.windows7.general
David B.[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 184
Default A simple way to transfer photos from your phone to Windowswithout installing anything on either

On 24/02/2018 08:07, Mike S wrote:

You can do a startup repair and then a complete 10 repair install with a
free w10 dvd (you d/l the iso for).

w10 disk image
https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/soft...load/windows10


As I'm using a Mac, I was redirected to this URL to download the ISO:-

https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/soft...d/windows10ISO

Once I burn the ISO to a disk will it be 'bootable' or will additional
action be required first?

If you can't boot from the hdd, boot from the dvd and run the startup
repair. If that is successful and you can boot from the hdd you can
reinstall all of the w10 system files while retaining your programs,
settings, and data, if needed.

w10 repair install procedure
https://neosmart.net/wiki/windows-10...-installation/


That is helpful advice!

--
David B.

 




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