A Photography forum. PhotoBanter.com

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » PhotoBanter.com forum » Digital Photography » Digital Photography
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

Where I keep my spare cats.



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #41  
Old May 19th 17, 08:26 PM posted to rec.photo.digital
David B.[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 38
Default Where I keep my spare cats.

On 5/19/2017 7:19 PM, PAS wrote:
On 5/19/2017 1:29 PM, David B. wrote:
On 5/19/2017 6:13 PM, PAS wrote:
[....]
My wife and I have been, thankfully, spared the loss of a child. But
we have lost some dogs over the years. My wife was not always the
dog lover I am. We got our first dog when our youngest of two sons
was an infant so she had her priorities and it wasn't a new dog, that
was mine. Fast forward about 26 years and we got a dog after going
about five years without one. My wife named her Maya and she was an
awesome dog. She was a bear-coat Shar Pei which you don't see often

As a puppy: http://www.pete-the-greek.com/Pets/Maya/i-WNFH8Rd/A

Full-grown: http://www.pete-the-greek.com/Pets/Maya/i-fp8xSGf/A


Wow! :-) I've never seen such a dog! Thanks for sharing the photographs.

Maya died two years ago at the age of 5 1/2. To say my wife was
devastated is an understatement. She was attached to that dog in a
way I had never seen. There are days where I still find her crying
over Maya.


I'm saddened to learn of your loss. I, too, have cried over the loss
of my pets over the years. They do, as you know, become a part of you.

They certainly do become part of us. We have two now, Bella and Bubba.
Bubba is from the same litter as Maya was. Bella is six months younger
from the same father but different mother. We haven't had Bubba since
he was a pup, we only had Maya at the time. Bella came six months
later. A family on Long Island not far from us bought Bubba. Three
years ago they decided they had to give him up. The couple who bought
him had a baby at the time and three years later had another one. Her
mother was going to care for the two children while the mother went back
to work but she was allergic to dogs so they gave him up. When you buy
a dog from the breeder we got them from, you agree that if you decide to
give up the dog for any reason then you must give the breeder first
opportunity to take the dog. The breeder is in North Carolina, quite a
distance from Long Island. The couple was being difficult and they were
adamant that they would give the breeder one week to come and get the
dog or else they would send him to a shelter. She was upset about this
because she couldn't get to Long Island within a week - she has a family
and a job and what-not to attend to. She asked us if we would take
Bubba until a suitable place was found for him. We agreed immediately
and after having him for a day, we decided we would keep him. He's a
timid dog but a good boy. I wonder what causes him to be so timid
because he avoids being pet most of the time, as if he is afraid. I
wonder how he was treated by his other family.


Lots of love ...... and time ...... will no doubt help him to relax.

I wish you good luck with Bubba.

--
David B.

  #42  
Old May 19th 17, 08:33 PM posted to rec.photo.digital
David B.[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 38
Default Where I keep my spare cats.

On 5/19/2017 7:08 PM, Savageduck wrote:
On 2017-05-19 17:29:08 +0000, "David B." said:

On 5/19/2017 6:13 PM, PAS wrote:
[....]
My wife and I have been, thankfully, spared the loss of a child. But
we have lost some dogs over the years. My wife was not always the
dog lover I am. We got our first dog when our youngest of two sons
was an infant so she had her priorities and it wasn't a new dog, that
was mine. Fast forward about 26 years and we got a dog after going
about five years without one. My wife named her Maya and she was an
awesome dog. She was a bear-coat Shar Pei which you don't see often

As a puppy: http://www.pete-the-greek.com/Pets/Maya/i-WNFH8Rd/A

Full-grown: http://www.pete-the-greek.com/Pets/Maya/i-fp8xSGf/A


Wow! :-) I've never seen such a dog! Thanks for sharing the photographs.


Yup! My "Step-daughter from Hell" had a Shar Pei, and I had a better
relationship with the dog than with her.


I just LOVE your sense of humour!

This is another scan, shot with a K1000, some 25 years ago. You might
say that my hair is somewhat fairer, and beard more obvious these days.
https://www.dropbox.com/s/1dcu4i7ru2sxe8u/LCO%2BHc.jpg


Nice one! :-)

--
David B.
  #43  
Old May 19th 17, 11:57 PM posted to rec.photo.digital
PeterN[_6_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,245
Default Where I keep my spare cats.

On 5/19/2017 2:19 PM, PAS wrote:
On 5/19/2017 1:29 PM, David B. wrote:
On 5/19/2017 6:13 PM, PAS wrote:
[....]
My wife and I have been, thankfully, spared the loss of a child. But
we have lost some dogs over the years. My wife was not always the
dog lover I am. We got our first dog when our youngest of two sons
was an infant so she had her priorities and it wasn't a new dog, that
was mine. Fast forward about 26 years and we got a dog after going
about five years without one. My wife named her Maya and she was an
awesome dog. She was a bear-coat Shar Pei which you don't see often

As a puppy: http://www.pete-the-greek.com/Pets/Maya/i-WNFH8Rd/A

Full-grown: http://www.pete-the-greek.com/Pets/Maya/i-fp8xSGf/A


Wow! :-) I've never seen such a dog! Thanks for sharing the photographs.

Maya died two years ago at the age of 5 1/2. To say my wife was
devastated is an understatement. She was attached to that dog in a
way I had never seen. There are days where I still find her crying
over Maya.


I'm saddened to learn of your loss. I, too, have cried over the loss
of my pets over the years. They do, as you know, become a part of you.

They certainly do become part of us. We have two now, Bella and Bubba.
Bubba is from the same litter as Maya was. Bella is six months younger
from the same father but different mother. We haven't had Bubba since
he was a pup, we only had Maya at the time. Bella came six months
later. A family on Long Island not far from us bought Bubba. Three
years ago they decided they had to give him up. The couple who bought
him had a baby at the time and three years later had another one. Her
mother was going to care for the two children while the mother went back
to work but she was allergic to dogs so they gave him up. When you buy
a dog from the breeder we got them from, you agree that if you decide to
give up the dog for any reason then you must give the breeder first
opportunity to take the dog. The breeder is in North Carolina, quite a
distance from Long Island. The couple was being difficult and they were
adamant that they would give the breeder one week to come and get the
dog or else they would send him to a shelter. She was upset about this
because she couldn't get to Long Island within a week - she has a family
and a job and what-not to attend to. She asked us if we would take
Bubba until a suitable place was found for him. We agreed immediately
and after having him for a day, we decided we would keep him. He's a
timid dog but a good boy. I wonder what causes him to be so timid
because he avoids being pet most of the time, as if he is afraid. I
wonder how he was treated by his other family.


My guess is that he was never properly socialized, or that he is upset
over his change of pack leader. You cannot force him to do anything.
Talk softly to him at all times. Hopefully he won't become aggressive
out of fear. Try frequent hand feeding with treats. I assume he will
let you brush him. If so, give him treats while brushing, and every so
often substitute your hand for a brush.

--
PeterN
  #44  
Old May 20th 17, 08:18 AM posted to rec.photo.digital
David B.[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 38
Default Where I keep my spare cats.

On 5/19/2017 11:57 PM, PeterN wrote:
On 5/19/2017 2:19 PM, PAS wrote:
On 5/19/2017 1:29 PM, David B. wrote:
On 5/19/2017 6:13 PM, PAS wrote:
[....]
My wife and I have been, thankfully, spared the loss of a child. But
we have lost some dogs over the years. My wife was not always the
dog lover I am. We got our first dog when our youngest of two sons
was an infant so she had her priorities and it wasn't a new dog, that
was mine. Fast forward about 26 years and we got a dog after going
about five years without one. My wife named her Maya and she was an
awesome dog. She was a bear-coat Shar Pei which you don't see often

As a puppy: http://www.pete-the-greek.com/Pets/Maya/i-WNFH8Rd/A

Full-grown: http://www.pete-the-greek.com/Pets/Maya/i-fp8xSGf/A

Wow! :-) I've never seen such a dog! Thanks for sharing the photographs.

Maya died two years ago at the age of 5 1/2. To say my wife was
devastated is an understatement. She was attached to that dog in a
way I had never seen. There are days where I still find her crying
over Maya.

I'm saddened to learn of your loss. I, too, have cried over the loss
of my pets over the years. They do, as you know, become a part of you.

They certainly do become part of us. We have two now, Bella and Bubba.
Bubba is from the same litter as Maya was. Bella is six months younger
from the same father but different mother. We haven't had Bubba since
he was a pup, we only had Maya at the time. Bella came six months
later. A family on Long Island not far from us bought Bubba. Three
years ago they decided they had to give him up. The couple who bought
him had a baby at the time and three years later had another one. Her
mother was going to care for the two children while the mother went back
to work but she was allergic to dogs so they gave him up. When you buy
a dog from the breeder we got them from, you agree that if you decide to
give up the dog for any reason then you must give the breeder first
opportunity to take the dog. The breeder is in North Carolina, quite a
distance from Long Island. The couple was being difficult and they were
adamant that they would give the breeder one week to come and get the
dog or else they would send him to a shelter. She was upset about this
because she couldn't get to Long Island within a week - she has a family
and a job and what-not to attend to. She asked us if we would take
Bubba until a suitable place was found for him. We agreed immediately
and after having him for a day, we decided we would keep him. He's a
timid dog but a good boy. I wonder what causes him to be so timid
because he avoids being pet most of the time, as if he is afraid. I
wonder how he was treated by his other family.


My guess is that he was never properly socialized, or that he is upset
over his change of pack leader. You cannot force him to do anything.
Talk softly to him at all times. Hopefully he won't become aggressive
out of fear. Try frequent hand feeding with treats. I assume he will
let you brush him. If so, give him treats while brushing, and every so
often substitute your hand for a brush.



That's good advice, Peter. :-)

--
David B.

  #45  
Old May 20th 17, 03:00 PM posted to rec.photo.digital
Diesel
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 273
Default Where I keep my spare cats.

PeterN news Fri, 19 May 2017 00:58:24 GMT in rec.photo.digital, wrote:

On 5/18/2017 8:06 PM, Diesel wrote:
PeterN news Thu, 18 May 2017 16:51:26 GMT in rec.photo.digital, wrote:

You can have sweet dogs and nasty ones of any breed. A lot
depends on their training and socialization. Having said that,
some breeds such as Akitas, can be very protective. My younger
daughter was walking her neighbor's Akita, and went for a coffee
in an outside cafe. Some guy started to bother her. the Akita
sensed a problem, stood up and just stared at a point in the
sidewalk. The dog made it clear that his eyes were focused on a
line, and that he would protect if anyone crossed the line. Even
the drunk realized it. a few minutes later someone called the
cops, and they quickly took the drunk away. when the cop came
over to my daughter to ask if she was OK, the Akita just sat
down and went into friendly mode.


You seem very knowledgeable concerning Dogs and their mindsets. I
appreciate you having taken the time to post this.


both of my kids and quite a few of my friends are serious dog
owners. My older daughter spends every weekend taking her golden
to various dog events, such as hunting, agility, tracking and
retrieving competitions. the dog is a master senior hunter and as
I posted earlier, qualified at Westminster for the finals in
agility. The dog goes to a doggie chiropractor, and gets regular
warm water massages. My other daughter, for some reason, has a
natural attraction for animals. On more than one occasion, while
swimming, wild dolphins would swim in and pay with her. In order
to keep up with them, I have had to learn something about animals,
Just as they had to learn something about art and music, in order
to keep up with me and my wife.


I understand, completely. I've had dogs and cats (I'm more of a cat
person myself, but, others in the family are dog people) my entire
life. We've been known to take in strays and rescue abused critters
since I was a kid. My mom presently has five pitbulls of various sub
breeds that are rescue animals. Loving creatures, with a bad
reputation based on ignorance.


--
I would like to apologize for not having offended you yet.
Please be patient. I will get to you shortly.
  #46  
Old May 20th 17, 03:00 PM posted to rec.photo.digital
Diesel
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 273
Default Where I keep my spare cats.

Whisky-dave
Fri, 19
May 2017 10:08:54 GMT in rec.photo.digital, wrote:

[snip]

I don't download vunerable viewers.


How would you know if it was when you downloaded it? The
vulnerability reports tend to come after the fact.


I stick to the ones most used, presently I have 3 browsers
running. firefox, chrome and safari, ech have their own uses or
rather I put them to specific uses.


Those are browsers...Your knowledge of IT leaves a bit to be desired...

As far as the three browsers you just listed, all three of them have
had vulnerabilites and patches issued as a result of the ones
identified. That does *not* mean they've all been identified, yet,
either. Likely pointless to explain why one in particular isn't so
good from a privacy POV.

someone calling themselves
emailed mt this morining with a zip attachment called
5566046.zip do you think I should open that zip if so why ?


The .zip file itself, short of using a vulnerable archiving tool
(and don't bother claiming that doesn't exist, I cited winzip only
because of it's popularity and it's had several issues) poses no
threat whatsoever to you. It's ONLY a file container with
compression. It's the contents within that matters. I tried to
explain that to you previously, but, you wouldn't listen.

So, in my professional opinion, I think you should let an adult from
your I.T dept help you out. You don't seem capable of making sound
decisions on your own.

You think the Mac is immune?


far more imune than PC's no mac as far as I know has been infected
by the lastest worm that afect the NHS and another 200,000 odd
users.


The latest worm is a win32 PE executable. Your mac, without
additional work on your end cannot execute the program. It wasn't
written for your mac. So, your example, is a bad one.

That does *not* mean malware written specifically to take advantage
of mac users doesn't exist. infact, it does. But, Mac doesn't have
the userbase that Windows systems do. Rather, it's a niche market
for malware authors interest. Hospitals don't routinely use Macs.

They're overpriced and incapable of competing against a PC with the
same level of money dumped into it. They do good (ie: struggle) to
compete with an inexpensive PC these days.

If one should put the cash a typical mac costs into a PC clone, the
mac doesn't stand a chance. Macs used to specialize in graphics
design, and photography work; but, the newer video cards and
software available for the PC made the mac unable to realistically
compete there either. At best, it's become a level playing field
now.

Macs used to have the schools in the US on essential lockdown, but,
that's changed too. Now adays, kids are sent home with Windows based
laptops on lease from the school, typically budget Dells (in this
area)

In fact, Pixar (Now Disneys company) uses PC clones to do the
animated 'movies' you see these days. Not macs.

That's what you get for choosing to remain closed and proprietary.
Left behind.

The poster of the link isn't the one who creates the scripts
dropbox uses, so what does trusting the poster have to do with my
question?


everything. Just like lending someone yuor car, computer or
anything else.


I fail to see the comparison. So again, I'll ask, since the user you
trust has no control over any of the scripts dropbox uses, what
difference does it make if you know the person or not?


ROFL! It indicates NOTHING of the sort.


Yes it does it's why banks use it.


Your assumption isn't that accurate. Banks exchange sensitive
information with you. The site interacts with you. It's in your best
interest to have the comms encrypted and be sure you're actually on
the banks own domain. HTTPS tries to cover that for you. I write
tries because, well, various certs have been forged before rendering
the domain assurance null and void.

My site does NOT interact with you, offers a program that was always
free and has been discontinued for years now. there's no incentive
or reason otherwise to deal with paying for a cert and encrypting
the data. So again, you might want to review the HTTPS link I
provided you previously from slashdot if you actually want the
technical specifics on it. I suspect, though, you could care less.
As, it's likely beyond your limited understanding. After all, you
think a .zip file by itself, is dangerous.


http://www.helpwithpcs.com/jargon/http.htm
What is HTTPS?
HTTPS is a secure adaptation of HTTP which you will find in
common use on secure areas when visiting websites.


exactly.


As I told you, My domain has no secure areas for you to visit.
There's no valid reason for me to use HTTPS. Do you need to research
what a 'secure area' is?


As I told you, previously, there are no secure areas on the
bughunter site. It doesn't host a forum, it offers you, the
visitor, NO INTERACTION. No scripts, no pictures (Unless you want
to click the link pointing to the jpeg of my deceased red long
hair persian)


and I have even less intrest in your sex life.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Persian_%28cat%29

So you have the maturity level of a small child then?

It's a plain jane html site


I thought yuo disabled HTML emails.


You seem to be confused on basic terminology as well. If I'm using
words that are confusing to you, just specify which ones and I'll
try to dumb this down further for you. I feel sorry for your I.T
department.

There's nothing it's going to 'run' inside your browser.


says who ?


Well, since I wrote the sites html in notepad, and, it's my site,
I'm saying so. You do realize you could literally download the sites
index file and load it in your favorite text editor/viewer, without
rendering a single line in your browser, right? Well, in your case,
you probably don't know that. But, I digress. You can (well,
probably not you), but someone with actual technical knowledge
could.

I don't need that knowlege and I very much doubt you could teach
it anyway.


LOL! The individual I tried to warn you about would disagree with
you. I'm infamous as a former blackhat. I've got quite the
reputation that he enjoys reminding me of at times. Some of my
'work' was written about in Rolling Stone magazine. So, doubt all
you like.

As presently, you're spreading FUD. You're probably okay with
that, but, it is annoying for those of us who know better.


You know better by telling peole to download zip files because no
harmn can come of it. ?


A .zip file by itself is harmless. You actually run a better risk of
something nasty coming from a pdf...

it will never go away while the ignorant download things without
any thought.


What part of, downloading something doesn't automatically result in
an 'infection' is too complicated for you to understand?

which is why I donlt trust starngers offering zips.


I understand. You're a bit of a technological idiot, and, you think
a .zip file by itself if you download it can infect you. Ignorance
is a curable condition, but, what you suffer from, there's just no
cure. You can't fix stupid.

But you can't post a text file or a PDF of such things only a zip.


A PDF actually presents more of a danger to you. I could slip you a
mickey with a pdf file much easier than I could a zip file. The PDF
can contain code that you wouldn't know was there, until your PDF
viewer of choice executed it for you (pending your pdf viewer is
exploitable, and, it most likely is) And, by then, it's too late.

http://www.esecurityplanet.com/secur...em-3932511.htm
In early 2010, PDF exploits were by far the most common malware
tactic, representing more than 47 percent of all Q1 infections
tracked by Kaspersky Labs. By mid-year, PDF exploits had fallen to
30 percent, overtaken by Java. However, PDF remains the world's
second most popular target.

1. Low-hanging fruit: One of the biggest reasons that PDF
exploits blossomed in 2009 was Adobe Reader's ubiquity. According to
Kaspersky researcher Roul Schouwenberg, hardening techniques like
Data Execution Prevention (DEP) and Address Space Layout
Randomization (ASLR) had been rolled into Windows, making OS
exploits less attractive. Malware writers searching for more fertile
fields seized upon PDF as a wildly popular monoculture ripe for
attack. Just about every desktop has a PDF reader installed --
usually Adobe Reader or Acrobat. This enormous pool of potential
victims translates into a financially lucrative attack target worthy
of investment in malware development.


2. Push-button exploits: In reality, as malware kits that
exploited PDF vulnerabilities became readily available, little
effort or expense was actually needed to tap this opportunity.
According to M86 Security Labs, malware kits such as LuckySploit,
CrimePack, and Fragus can be purchased for as little as $100 -- and
commonly top out around $1,000. This trend started with MPack but
really ramped up in 2008; today, most new malware kits include Adobe
Flash, Java classes and PDF-based exploits. Those kits made it
trivial to create obfuscated automated attacks that leveraged Adobe
Reader's many well-known code vulnerabilities.

3. Large attack surface: PDF is an industry standard portable
document format, implemented by many free and commercial programs.
But Adobe's Reader and Acrobat products are driven by an extremely
large and complex code base which includes numerous proprietary
extensions. This translates into functionality and flexibility --
characteristics that have made PDF a "universal language" for
document exchange. But it also means an extremely large attack
surface that has proven difficult for Adobe and anti-malware vendors
to defend. One example: Adobe Reader supports embedded Javascript
objects -- yet another foothold that malware writers can use to gain
traction.

4. Slow moving mitigation: According to a Microsoft Security
Intelligence Report, three Adobe Reader vulnerabilities -- patched
in May 2008, November 2008 and March 2009 -- accounted for more than
46 percent of all browser-based attacks. Vulnerabilities such as
these were so widely exploited because, until mid-2010, Adobe did
not have an auto-update infrastructure. Soon after an updater was
released, PDF exploits began to decline. However, they did not
disappear because 1) users must opt into auto-updates, and 2)
updates are only checked for the installed version. Thus, users
still running Adobe Reader 7.0 or 8.0 may think they are current,
having enabled auto-update and installed all available patches. But
they should really be moving to Reader X to avoid exploits that
succeed only against older versions.


5. The race is still on: During the past year, Adobe has taken
significant steps to reduce PDF exploitation. In addition to
auto-updates, Adobe developed an Adobe Reader Protected Mode a
secure sandbox in which PDFs can be opened for display, handcuffing
malware calls to other applications and using policy to determine
actions that are automatically allowed or blocked. Unfortunately,
users can defeat these protections by clicking "yes." Although users
may now realize that PDFs are used for phishing, many still don't
think of PDFs as harboring malware. And attackers continue to find
new holes to exploit and new ways to evade detection. for example,
return-oriented programming (ROP) and stolen digital certificates
have played roles in recent PDF exploits.

You can click the link if you want to know more about pdf 0wnage.

Atleast with the .zip file, It can't do anything to you until you
unzip and 'run' whatever files are present inside. I'd have to coax
you into running one or more files inside the zip, but, with a pdf,
I'd just need you to 'view' it to give you a gift. And, you seem
stupid enough to do that, based on what you've written.

Ypou can post a link that actual gives information rather than
just a download link, a sign of a scammer if you knew anything
about security or malware yuo should know that these sort of
things are what you don't access in anyway.


You think I know nothing about security and/or malware do you?

The urls below are by no means the full extent of the malicious code
I'm responsible for having authored, but, it *should* put your
assumption that I know nothing about security and/or malware to
rest. If not, well, there's just no helping your ignorance on the
matter. I can fix many things of a technical and electrical nature, but
I can't fix stupid.

https://www.f-secure.com/v-descs/irok.shtml
https://www.f-secure.com/v-descs/toadie.shtml

I specifically included HTTPS links for you, as for some reason, you
think HTTP links are 'unsafe'

It's also worth noting that the irok family was my last series of
viruses, authored nearly two decades ago. I've since put the
knowledge I have to good use in helping keep systems I'm responsible
for secure from such things.

BugHunter (the program hosted on the domain with the same name) was
my attempt to try and make things right for the damage I caused to
people I didn't know. Along with working for Malwarebytes as an
expert malware reseacher.

I *was* a blackhat hacker, but, these days, I'm a grayhat. I still
have a few vices, but none of it's related to authoring malicious
code of ANY kind. Due to my past, I'm always under peer review, as I
told you. It wouldn't benefit me in the least little bit to do
anything nefarious to your system or anyone elses.

Which is why as I explained, numerous times already, the .zip file I
offered poses absolutely NO threat of any kind to you. Another
individual you likely don't know or trust already confirmed what's
inside of it.

My forst computer had 16k of RAM.


That's nice, but, I get the impression you didn't graduate beyond
that of an end user, based on our discussion so far.

On my first webpage I wanted and animated gif and most had 14.4k
modems so I made a gif of 3 flying bats that was less than 1Kb


it's possible some users were 14.4k, but, depending on when they
started surfing the web, they could have been using 28.8k, 33.6k, or
56k

My first online experience was on a 2400baud modem, on the internet,
but, not on the www as it didn't exist yet. I was also a serious BBS
user as well as SysOp...Enough strolling down memory lane though.

As I said, you don't strike me as a tech savvy individual. Mac is
probably well suited for your IT abilities. It holds hands, quite
nicely.

Nowerday a lot of google adds are more than 1/2 meg, I watch HD
trailers on-line, I play a an online game with guite good graphics
all from the browser. I've vie lots of 10MB files of the mariation
surface on-line.


Are you not a good typist either? Or, is something else up here?

Telling people to download zips is stupid, it;s one of the
simpleest things you can do to protect yourself is NOT to download
zips.


Zips are just files that cannot do any harm to you by themselves.
It's the contents when unzipped that determines harm value. The .zip
file itself plays no role in that. To think otherwise, is, well,
just ignorant.

Many programs can be found online in .zips. BugHunter comes as a
..zip file, for example. As do MANY others. It's an industry standard
archive format.

That was the first thought, as T.Rex were the first band I liked
as a child , the first record I brought was by them but can't
remmeber which record.


I'm starting to think that your thought processes are in need of
work, as you confused a cat reference as having something to do with
my sex life...

It's far more likely than me downloading a zip from someone I
don't know.


Downloading a .zip file poses no threat to you or anyone else.
Blindly running scripts you know nothing about, Opening pdf files
can be a security risk to you, mac or not. And, I bet you don't even
think twice about doing it.

http://www.esecurityplanet.com/secur...em-3932511.htm


So if that's what you're hoping for, I'd watch the sky
for that ICMP you're expecting.


I'm hoping for nothing actually. You seem to be one of those
incurably stupid individuals on the internet. I would say I pity
you, but, I'm fresh out.


--
I would like to apologize for not having offended you yet.
Please be patient. I will get to you shortly.
  #47  
Old May 20th 17, 05:16 PM posted to rec.photo.digital
PeterN[_7_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 266
Default Where I keep my spare cats.

On 5/20/2017 10:00 AM, Diesel wrote:
PeterN news Fri, 19 May 2017 00:58:24 GMT in rec.photo.digital, wrote:

On 5/18/2017 8:06 PM, Diesel wrote:
PeterN news Thu, 18 May 2017 16:51:26 GMT in rec.photo.digital, wrote:

You can have sweet dogs and nasty ones of any breed. A lot
depends on their training and socialization. Having said that,
some breeds such as Akitas, can be very protective. My younger
daughter was walking her neighbor's Akita, and went for a coffee
in an outside cafe. Some guy started to bother her. the Akita
sensed a problem, stood up and just stared at a point in the
sidewalk. The dog made it clear that his eyes were focused on a
line, and that he would protect if anyone crossed the line. Even
the drunk realized it. a few minutes later someone called the
cops, and they quickly took the drunk away. when the cop came
over to my daughter to ask if she was OK, the Akita just sat
down and went into friendly mode.

You seem very knowledgeable concerning Dogs and their mindsets. I
appreciate you having taken the time to post this.


both of my kids and quite a few of my friends are serious dog
owners. My older daughter spends every weekend taking her golden
to various dog events, such as hunting, agility, tracking and
retrieving competitions. the dog is a master senior hunter and as
I posted earlier, qualified at Westminster for the finals in
agility. The dog goes to a doggie chiropractor, and gets regular
warm water massages. My other daughter, for some reason, has a
natural attraction for animals. On more than one occasion, while
swimming, wild dolphins would swim in and pay with her. In order
to keep up with them, I have had to learn something about animals,
Just as they had to learn something about art and music, in order
to keep up with me and my wife.


I understand, completely. I've had dogs and cats (I'm more of a cat
person myself, but, others in the family are dog people) my entire
life. We've been known to take in strays and rescue abused critters
since I was a kid. My mom presently has five pitbulls of various sub
breeds that are rescue animals. Loving creatures, with a bad
reputation based on ignorance.



They are like family.

--
PeterN
  #48  
Old May 20th 17, 05:23 PM posted to rec.photo.digital
nospam
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 20,261
Default Where I keep my spare cats.

In article 3, Diesel
wrote:


You think the Mac is immune?


far more imune than PC's no mac as far as I know has been infected
by the lastest worm that afect the NHS and another 200,000 odd
users.


The latest worm is a win32 PE executable. Your mac, without
additional work on your end cannot execute the program. It wasn't
written for your mac. So, your example, is a bad one.


it's not a bad example at all. it's one example of many that shows that
malware on a mac is *far* less of a problem than on windows.

That does *not* mean malware written specifically to take advantage
of mac users doesn't exist. infact, it does.


it does, but it's rare and relies on the user to do something stupid.
the exploit is not the mac, but the person using it.

there isn't any mac malware that propagates entirely on its own.

But, Mac doesn't have
the userbase that Windows systems do. Rather, it's a niche market
for malware authors interest.


wrong. while the raw numbers of macs aren't as high, it's a *very*
lucrative market for a number of reasons.

the problem is that it's very difficult to write effective malware on a
mac. it must rely on tricking the user to do something, at which point
it's not a mac exploit, but rather a human exploit. there is no end to
human exploits. it's easy to trick people.

Hospitals don't routinely use Macs.


yes they do, as well as a significant number of ios devices.

while windows may be the most common, it's not the only system in use.

They're overpriced and incapable of competing against a PC with the
same level of money dumped into it. They do good (ie: struggle) to
compete with an inexpensive PC these days.


complete nonsense.

not only do macs *not* struggle, but they are competitively priced with
similar pcs, often less expensive.

If one should put the cash a typical mac costs into a PC clone, the
mac doesn't stand a chance. Macs used to specialize in graphics
design, and photography work; but, the newer video cards and
software available for the PC made the mac unable to realistically
compete there either. At best, it's become a level playing field
now.


level playing field means they *do* compete and are *not* overpriced or
struggling.

can't have it both ways.

Macs used to have the schools in the US on essential lockdown, but,
that's changed too. Now adays, kids are sent home with Windows based
laptops on lease from the school, typically budget Dells (in this
area)


nope. schools have mostly moved to chromebooks. there are also a lot of
ipads in use too.

In fact, Pixar (Now Disneys company) uses PC clones to do the
animated 'movies' you see these days. Not macs.


absolutely false.

movies are processed on a linux-based render farm, with mostly macs on
editor's desks. windows is for the boring ****, like payroll.

https://www.quora.com/Which-Disney-o...ve-been-render
ed-on-the-2013-Mac-Pro
Macs are used at Pixar primarily for storyboarding, art, editing,
sound, and administration - including a large fleet of laptops. Also
for the menus at the cafe and kiosk-style displays in the art
galleries. Animation is done on Linux boxes, and rendering on racks
of servers running Linux. Some Windows machines are used in
administration, payroll, the phone system, building management, and
such.
- Craig Good, An original PIxar employee. Worked there 31 years.

That's what you get for choosing to remain closed and proprietary.
Left behind.


nope. mac os is *less* proprietary than windows is. much of it is open
source. almost none of windows is open source.

that's slowly changing, however. microsoft is starting to do more with
open source and even embracing linux, something they trashed a decade
ago.




I don't need that knowlege and I very much doubt you could teach
it anyway.


LOL! The individual I tried to warn you about would disagree with
you. I'm infamous as a former blackhat. I've got quite the
reputation that he enjoys reminding me of at times. Some of my
'work' was written about in Rolling Stone magazine. So, doubt all
you like.


bull****.


As presently, you're spreading FUD. You're probably okay with
that, but, it is annoying for those of us who know better.


You know better by telling peole to download zip files because no
harmn can come of it. ?


A .zip file by itself is harmless.


by itself sure. once it's unzipped, not so much.

You actually run a better risk of
something nasty coming from a pdf...


that depends on the pdf viewer. some are safer than others.

it will never go away while the ignorant download things without
any thought.


What part of, downloading something doesn't automatically result in
an 'infection' is too complicated for you to understand?


absolutely false. it *can*.

which is why I donlt trust starngers offering zips.


I understand. You're a bit of a technological idiot, and, you think
a .zip file by itself if you download it can infect you. Ignorance
is a curable condition, but, what you suffer from, there's just no
cure. You can't fix stupid.


you prove that quite well.

But you can't post a text file or a PDF of such things only a zip.


A PDF actually presents more of a danger to you. I could slip you a
mickey with a pdf file much easier than I could a zip file. The PDF
can contain code that you wouldn't know was there, until your PDF
viewer of choice executed it for you (pending your pdf viewer is
exploitable, and, it most likely is) And, by then, it's too late.


since pdf is a native format on a mac, there is no 'pdf viewer'.

while there might be a way exploit pdf on a mac, it's rather unlikely
and getting more unlikely all the time.

your 'special' pdf is almost certainly *not* going to do much of
anything.

http://www.esecurityplanet.com/secur...nd-How-to-Avoi
d-Them-3932511.htm


tl;dr - don't install adobe acrobat or flash on any platform.

Ypou can post a link that actual gives information rather than
just a download link, a sign of a scammer if you knew anything
about security or malware yuo should know that these sort of
things are what you don't access in anyway.


You think I know nothing about security and/or malware do you?


not as much as you think you do, and very little of what you know is
applicable to macs.

you're also not the only person who knows about security.
  #49  
Old May 20th 17, 06:28 PM posted to rec.photo.digital
-hh
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 636
Default Where I keep my spare cats.

Overall, I find this entire thread quite hilarious... it stems from someone
for whatever reason has a case of claimed butthurt and they're trying to
subsequently rationalize their lame use of a .zip file to hoodwink some
disinterested third parties who don't know them from Adam into not only
believing their "story", but also that they should download a non-trustable file.

Thanks, but no. Troll boy needs to give up and go back to his Mommy's dogs
for the supposed 'sympathy' they're soliciting for. The whole act is hokey.
And, even if it was legit, invariably ancient news that's no longer germane.

-hh
  #50  
Old May 21st 17, 05:15 AM posted to rec.photo.digital
Gray_Wolf
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 50
Default Where I keep my spare cats.

On 5/20/2017 9:00 AM, Diesel wrote:
Whisky-dave
Fri, 19
May 2017 10:08:54 GMT in rec.photo.digital, wrote:

[snip]

I don't download vunerable viewers.

How would you know if it was when you downloaded it? The
vulnerability reports tend to come after the fact.


I stick to the ones most used, presently I have 3 browsers
running. firefox, chrome and safari, ech have their own uses or
rather I put them to specific uses.


Those are browsers...Your knowledge of IT leaves a bit to be desired...

As far as the three browsers you just listed, all three of them have
had vulnerabilites and patches issued as a result of the ones
identified. That does *not* mean they've all been identified, yet,
either. Likely pointless to explain why one in particular isn't so
good from a privacy POV.

someone calling themselves
emailed mt this morining with a zip attachment called
5566046.zip do you think I should open that zip if so why ?


The .zip file itself, short of using a vulnerable archiving tool
(and don't bother claiming that doesn't exist, I cited winzip only
because of it's popularity and it's had several issues) poses no
threat whatsoever to you. It's ONLY a file container with
compression. It's the contents within that matters. I tried to
explain that to you previously, but, you wouldn't listen.



I thought all the big boys use .rar At least on the Usenet binary groups.
I also had a crypto man tell that a properly passworded rar file was almost
impossible to break. He said zip was very insecure.


 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
THE 20D JUST LOVES CATS! annika1980.com 35mm Photo Equipment 4 June 4th 07 06:56 AM
Famous cats...... William Graham 35mm Photo Equipment 24 May 29th 07 08:20 AM
Cats and flash Roger (K8RI) Digital SLR Cameras 20 November 7th 06 08:14 AM
Storing Spare CF cards next to Spare Battery Ken Digital Photography 5 July 5th 06 08:58 PM
Cats Eye... (D70) Seymore Digital Photography 0 December 23rd 04 05:42 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 09:34 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2017 PhotoBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.